Apology To Socrates Analysis

Good Essays
Socrates, despite being executed centuries ago, continues to be a standing figure of a system of beliefs that is still exists today. Many people throughout the centuries have taken Socrates words into their own lives despite him being constantly ridiculed for being a disgrace to Athens. Throughout Plato’s Apology to Socrates, Socrates not only defends himself in the courtroom with honest facts about his life, but uses this as his last lecture to humanity in order to convince the people of Athens to follow his apprentices into live a life of virtue. In the beginning of the trial, Socrates appears to discreetly plant a seed of pity within the minds of his audience. He uses the praeteritio strategy well in this case by lightly foreshadowing …show more content…
To those who voted for Socrate’s release and freedom, Socrates seems to have more public sympathy and gratitude. Despite being moments away from death, he openly invites those who voted against his execution to “[tell] tales to one another as long as it is possible” (Plato, Apology, 39e). Although this statement of telling tales could be used in a general sense, it can be comprehended into something more than just exchanging stories. It can be seen as his last opportunity to go on and state his thoughts on what his death will means for Athens: a new beginning. This ‘new beginning’ is started bypassing the torch to his apprentices, such as Plato, so they shall continue to share his life work and philosophies long after he is gone. However, he also uses his apprentices as an act of intimidation amongst the rest of the crowd. Socrates stats that dispersed throughout the crowd in the courtroom, the majority of the audience has actually came to support Socrates in his time of desperate need. Socrates uses a forewarning to the members of the jury, as well as the crowd, that through his death they will seek revenge for more or less ‘murdering’ of their teacher who has given them meaning to their lives: “I affirm, you men who have condemned me to death, that vengeance will come upon you right after my death….there will be more who will refute you….they will be …show more content…
Through careful and through statements, he used his time in court to speak of his mortal value and his life’s purpose in hopes that many would gain sympathy for putting an innocent man through execution. Through Plato’s public publishing of Apology to Socrates, humans throughout centuries have continued to learn the true innocence that had been taken away from Socrates. But his legacy continues to live on in hopes that his life lessons will live on and inspire others on how life is truly measured, not in wealth, but in

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    According to Socrates, most Athenian trials consisted of the accuser bringing forth his “his children and many of his friends and family into the court to arouse as much pity as he could” (34c). To Socrates, this practice of gaining sympathy in order to better one’s chances of acquittal was immoral, as it spoiled the credibility of the law. Socrates states that in doing this, “these men bring shame upon the city” (35b). This is shameful because the men are attempting to supplant the word of the law with sympathy gained from these actions. Socrates mostly questions those who allow this act to influence their role as juror as he states, “It is not the purpose of a juryman’s office to give justice as a favor to whoever seems good to him, but to judge according to law, and this he has sworn to do.…

    • 1313 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    People are also to caught up in themselves to ever bother compromising we are stuck. Nothing productive is happening. Socrates is being put to death and he sets his needs aside to preserve the greater good. People have a narrow dogmatic view on things and with Socrates insight and strive for knowledge instead of being right, he would be able to bring reason into our political system. No doubt he would annoy everyone eventually with his constant…

    • 1716 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    King manages to make Socrates a better man and in turn, Socrates starts looking up to King as a brother he never had before. Socrates begins to be determined to help King on his journey to justice for all colored people. They develop a plan to help King escape from the prison, which they succeed in. However, they ended up being faced against a mob of white moderates who want King dead, but luckily, they are able to fight the mob off and seek shelter somewhere safe. After fighting the mob off, King expresses his feelings about how he hates using violence.…

    • 1374 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Plato's Apology Argument

    • 970 Words
    • 4 Pages

    In Plato’s Apology, Socrates is put on trial for accusations of disruptive behavior. Some men in the community feel that his way of life goes against the will of the Gods and corrupts the youth. As he stands before a jury that will ultimately decide his fate, Socrates states that “the difficulty… is not in avoiding death, but in avoiding the unrighteousness” (Plato 38). Socrates knows that death is inevitable, and repeatedly claims he does not fear it. He believes that it is harder to run from the injustices and evils of the world than it is from death, so he defends his philosophy even after execution becomes the verdict.…

    • 970 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Plato shows his respect for Socrates by writing the dialogues so that people in the future could read what he did. He thought he was a great man and mentor and looked up to him in many ways. Socrates offended many people by believing in the oracle, but it wasn’t his fault. It came off as rude that he was telling people that he was the wises, but he was the wisest because he knew what he didn’t know. That is what made him wise.…

    • 1330 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Downfall Of Socrates Essay

    • 1535 Words
    • 7 Pages

    The youth who followed Socrates dare to imitate him after having been listening. Following this, he was accused of inducing young people to the art of social and political criticism, to which Socrates responds by saying that he was only taught to philosophize. Also, Socrates was accused by introducing new divinities. He defended that the divine is the interior, as it provides, personal and social welfare, so it is totally ethical. the result of the election was the death penalty.…

    • 1535 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The people of Athens thought of Socrates as a corrupter of the youth. This can be seen in his books that involve Socrates called Memorabilia. Here, “Xenophon’s Socrates is shown in conversation with various people from a wide variety of walks of life and with quite starkly different moral characters... The individual books… consistently show a Socrates who is above all committed to helping people improve their lives in all practical dimensions; “Socrates was so useful in all circumstances and in all ways…” Memorabilia IV.i.1). In contrast to Plato’s Socrates, who is committed to “follow the argument wherever, like a wind, it may lead us” (Plato, Republic 394D), Xenophon’s Socrates strives always to send his conversation partners away with some nuggets of practical advice which they may put to use right away ( _____ ).” Xenophon’s story of the first couple of books defends Socrates’ loss and death which occur in his trial and the last two books explain his moral philosophy and which proves he does not corrupt the…

    • 442 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    This is believed to be Plato in his younger years when he attended his trial. His most loyal student, Crito, is seen on the right side of Socrates. On the far right side are soldiers cast in the darkest light of all characters shown in the scene. Socrates and Plato are painted in sharp and angular positions, showing that they were heavily based on principles; however, the students to the left were painted in curved positions showing that they were weak and driven by passion. The number of characters in this scene has decreased to ten, instead of the original fifteen members that were present at his death.…

    • 808 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Who Is Socrates?

    • 1111 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Who is Socrates? Was he nothing more than a 70 year old man who became an infamous figure in history due to his refusal to be part of the Athenian norm? How about a senior citizen during roman era who caught the eyes of many through quick thinking and persuasive rambling? Or maybe, he really was that great knowledgeable speaker destined to introduce the whole concept known as philosophy, who just happened to open the eyes of many; such as Plato and Aristotle. Socrates, now known as the father of western philosophy became most known for the series of events that occurred around the time of his trial.…

    • 1111 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Socrates defends himself against the accusations levied by his accusers and later, opens up to the jury, judges and spectators explaining his rationale motives behind his inquiries. Socrates spent most of his years assessing whether those who claimed to have wisdom truly had it. However, in this pursuit, he made…

    • 1268 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays