Apartheid Research Paper

Superior Essays
Apartheid Essay
Apartheid was the laws that separated different races in South Africa. Apartheid started in 1948 and ended in 1991. During Apartheid, the whites didn’t treat the blacks as equals. Harsh living conditions, awful events, and determined people contributed to the end of Apartheid in South Africa.
The living conditions for the blacks were very different compared to the whites. One example of an unfair living condition was the government (2). It was an all white government because they didn’t think the blacks would capable of running it. This wasn’t right because the whites wouldn’t let the blacks make any laws. Another example was the unreasonable population distribution (6). The blacks had 19 million people and the whites only had 4.5 million people. Even though the whites had less people, they got 87% of the land. The blacks had almost 15 million more people but they only got 13% of the land. This made it challenging for the blacks to live because there wasn’t enough room for everybody. As a result, most people were living in poverty. The last example was the segregation issue in South Africa (2). The whites and the blacks were seperated in schools, restrooms, and parks. Also public transportation and many other places were segregated too. The blacks had to receive a special pass to go into the whites space. These living conditions were very harsh and extremely biased. The white people in South Africa thought they were superior to the blacks and this motivated

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