Anti-War Satire In Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughter

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In the novel Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut it is immediately clear that the author’s intent was to write a novel revealing the effect that war has on the people involved and address these issues as well as how harmful the glamorization of them are by writing an anti-war satire. Vonnegut executed this successfully by explainingly thoroughly the lasting effects war has on people and using examples of the negative and desperate ways that these people will try to cope with their feelings after getting out of the war.
One important way Vonnegut explains how devastating war is, is by using understatements all throughout the novel. Examples of this can be found throughout the entire book, the most frequently used one being “so it goes”. Vonnegut

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