Anti-Corruption In Pakistan Case Study

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Since 1948, Myanmar has already established anti-corruption laws related to building integrity, but these laws have rarely been enforced and there has been any effective prosecution for the abuse of office (Chêne, 2012). When the civilian government came to office, it has undertaken significant legislative reforms including requiring all government officials to publicly declare their assets (Morrell, 2012). The 2008 Constitution also requires that the government submit the draft budget to the parliament for approval which was rarely made public during the previous regimes (Chêne, 2012). These developments were encouraging but more commitments from the government were needed to convince the people and the international community of its sincerity …show more content…
The Anti-Corruption Law has set clear objectives to eradicate bribery as a national cause and to emerge a clean government and good governance (Pyidaungsu Hlutaw, 2013). The Anti-Corruption Commission is the agency enforcing the Law. The emergence of the Law and the implementing agency were seen as an important step in the fight against corruption, but the effectiveness in their application remains to be proved. If the Commission had been established as an independent body, it would have been more powerful in investigating and prosecuting the cases involving senior officials of the …show more content…
It refers to unrestricted access by the public to timely and reliable information on decisions and performance in the public sector (Armstrong, 2005). A transparent government performs according to fixed and published rules, on the basis of information and procedures that are accessible to the general public (OECD, 2014). Transparency can be achieved when all public services, government policies and activities are clear, answerable and responsive to the citizens. Although the government has made some progress in the transparency of its public financial management and budgetary procedures, there are still many government ministries which do not fully comply to budgetary requirements and degree of openness in their activities. For instance, the military budget by the Ministry of Defence or the privatisation process of state assets by the Ministry of National Planning and Economic Development are under heavy criticism for lack of

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