Anterograde Amnesia Research

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Reliving today is not exactly a special phenomenon for many people. Generally, individuals live their lives according to a simple go to work and go to bed schedule with little variation. However, for some people, reliving today is only a product of forgetting that today already happened. Anterograde amnesia is a condition that is marked by patients being unable to store information in their short-term memory after a specific incident most commonly involving brain trauma. Having anterograde amnesia means that its victims can remember events leading up to the specific trauma they experience but do not form new memories after.
As with all psychological phenomena, Anterograde amnesia has been the topic of various cognitive research studies yet
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The early history of Anterograde Amnesia research is focused around general definitions and symptoms as well as ideas of what type of event causes this rare condition. Early case studies and research has brought about knowledge such as possibilities in terms of recovery and treatment. The evolution of anterograde amnesia research has been slow. Modern research has been geared towards coping, recovery, and how anterograde amnesia affects general understanding of the brain. Much of this modern research suggests that in certain cases anterograde amnesia is not permanent, such as in when it is brought on by Alcohol. Research also suggests that anterograde amnesia is can potentially be caused by a wider range of ailments than what was previously thought. A recent landmark study of Anterograde Amnesia was Profound Anterograde Amnesia Following Routine Anesthetic and Dental Procedure by Gerald H. Burgess and Bhanu Chadalavada. Other landmark studies have included research regarding damage to the hippocampus as well as cases of anterograde amnesia being a symptom of an athletic concussion. The most famous psychology study is that of Patient H.M. who had suffered extreme amnesia due to having parts of his brain removed due to severe …show more content…
The theories that have been developed by experts mostly involve the hippocampus and the essential function that it provides. Continued research on Anterograde Amnesia is important in order to gain knew knowledge about the hippocampus as well as other psychological phenomena related to anterograde amnesia, such as Alzheimer’s and retrograde amnesia.
The studies presented in this paper address modern questions posed by researchers about anterograde amnesia. What has mainly been discovered is that some forms of anterograde amnesia can be treated if they are not the result of permanent brain damage. These studies have also presented questions to allow for further research, especially when it comes to the odd case of the patient who developed anterograde amnesia from a common dental procedure.
For the most part, research on anterograde amnesia does not contain many contradictions. Certain gaps exist in amnesia research, specifically regarding brain surgery and the hippocampus. It is hard to say exactly what the future of amnesia research will lead to but it is important to continue to develop care and treatment options for patients. Anterograde Amnesia research could not only improve our understanding of this specific illness, but build on our current knowledge of the brain and its structures.

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