Animals Compared To Human

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Animals are thought to be separate from humans. However, they both are in the animal kingdom, and even as mammals they share certain characteristics: they are vertebrates, endothermic, have body hair, and mammary glands. These characteristics are what relates animals to humans. Although, there are various aspects which distinguishes an animal from a human. Humans are self-conscious beings, who have emotions, language, a complex thought process, and philosophical thinking. These are the key distinctive qualities of being a human. This claim that animals are “outside” of the human overlooks the fact that humans express animalist behavior and even have to repress animalist behavior in order to act and be a human. Humans have to control themselves …show more content…
The inside has to control the people and their actions in order to maintain a stable inside and thus produce an image of a great city on the outside. The order of the city is maintained by excluding the foreigner or chaos from the city. Likewise, the animal inside the human has to be controlled in order for the human to appear and act as a human. The human not only has to maintain its order by excluding anything foreign but also by suppressing the animal inside. The human has to control their inner animal in order to be a peaceful, well-ordered human on the outside. In relation to reaching philosophical thinking one has to be “a-topos”, which in the Phaedrus is outside the city. The philosophical thinking is achieved by the human, who is outside compared to the animal which is inside of the human. The inside in both situations have to be controlled in order for a well-maintained outside to …show more content…
Similarly, the city has to maintain and control their city in order for them to appear as a powerful city. Both require an extensive amount of dominance over their inside in order for them to conserve the well-being and order of themselves. Plato and Euripides each defined their own notion of the distinction of inside and outside. Plato establishes the separation of inside and outside with the shift of dialogue that takes place once they move to the outside of the city between Socrates and Phaedrus. Euripides defines two sets of distinctions of inside and outside: inside and outside the city, and the animal inside the human. While Plato associates inside and outside with acquiring the level of philosophical thinking, Euripides associates inside and outside with animal and humans. Plato’s suggestion that the experience of being out of place can be placed to practically anything: that when one is out of place or outside one’s common ground, this person will perceive their surroundings more carefully and might even notice something that they probably wouldn’t have noticed if they were comfortable or in a familiar place. One just has to leave their comfort zone in order to discover the world around them and reach a level of philosophical thinking that they didn’t know they could

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