Factory Farming

1730 Words 7 Pages
A newborn is delivered into a world of filth and darkness. It cries for its mother attention, but is met with cold, rough hands, chained and thrown into a stall along with several others that look like itself. Confusion and fear takes over and it screams and fights, however, the chains hold and tear its fresh skin. The only life it will ever know is one of pain and suffering and any hope it has of a normal life is gone the moment it is born. This is the life of an animal born in a factory farm, an industry that confines a massive number of livestock into a cramped living space with little care for the quality of life or health of the animals. An in-depth analysis of the standard of living for industrial food animals reveals that it is imperative …show more content…
Industrial food animal productions are considered an agricultural process, meaning they are largely exempt from monitoring and surveillance from states and the federal government. Without monitoring, it is very difficult for health officials to reduce the risks associated with this type of farming, allowing workers to serve as a “bridging population between their communities and animal confinement facilities” (“Public Health Threat” 10). Without proper regulation, workers can easily transmit bacteria and viruses to their families and …show more content…
The lives of the animals involved in factory farms are dreadful and never-ending. They experience constant pain and tortue and rarely, if ever, get to see a sliver of a normal life. Communities also feel the devastating effects of this style of farming as workers can easily transmit diseases from the unsanitary and unregulated workplace. Furthermore, the constant use of antibiotics on livestock for unnecessary purposes have increased bacteria-resistant strains, making diseases significantly harder to come up with a cure for. The environment is another victim of this type of system; the gases produced are the most harmful to the ozone layer and the livestock waste is immensely difficult to treat and control with massive factory farms. Waste ends up in the land and water, poisoning wildlife and contaminating food and water sources. This style of farming needs to be broken up and dispersed into smaller, more organized farms, not only to protect the animals’ wellbeing, but to also protect the health of the human population and the planet we depend

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