Animalism In Lord Of The Flies

1332 Words 5 Pages
In all types of war, every person will have a positive or negative emotion that impacts his or her life in the future. Soldiers may have new ideas about people that change their perspective about culture. For example, some people only do what their culture says, while others believe in free will. Free will is the option of choice, which is great for people leading lives rather than following. Free will gives people the sense of dignity that allows them to respect humanity. But, not everyone grows up with the important of human dignity engraved in their mind. So through war torn environments, people start creating the idea of human savagery. The idea of dignity disappears, and people only see the negative side of situation. In the events of …show more content…
Just like everyone else, Jack is a British schoolboy, but he is the leader of the choir and the head boy. The first act of animalistic behavior Jack shows occurs during the hunt. Jack and his followers have seen a pig roaming the camp, and they want to kill it as an offering. Originally, the idea of killing the pig is out of survival but when Jack smears the pig’s blood on his face, he shows his dominance. After the kill, Jack’s identity starts coming through, and his behavior begins to change. He wants a reenactment of the kill to take place, so he stands by the fire and starts chanting “Kill the pig. Cut her throat. Bash her in.” Soon everyone joins in, causing their dignity to diminish by showing their barbaric side. This proves Golding’s idea that if one person takes action in a culture, then everyone repeats (Rosenfield 2). Even though Jack is becoming a frenzied animal, the children on the island start worrying about another creature: the beast. Sam and Eric, two children on the island, spot a victim falling from the sky in a parachute. When they see this creature dead against rocks, they run back to camp screaming they have seen a beast. Jack immediately starts taking action and wants to find the beast. Ralph joins him on the adventure, but as they approach the beast, they run away in terror. Returning to camp, Jack speaks out against Ralph and wants everyone to reject Ralph …show more content…
Ralph starts looking around for any other individuals who have survived the crash. While looking for survivors, he finds a conch on the ground. He does not think much of the conch, but he decides to keep it. Ralph starts finding others, and a group begins to form with all the survivors of the crash. The petrified boys are crying over the idea of death, so Ralph takes action by creating rules. The main rule created circulates around the importance of the conch. The conch is a symbol of power, and whoever holds the conch may speak. Since Ralph holds the conch, he speaks out saying, “We have got to have rules and obey. After all, we are not savages, we are English” (40). This quotes generalizes everyone in the English culture to be the same, but Jack and Ralph prove to be different. Ralph remains humanistic by proving that your culture does not define who you are, your humanity does. Even after surviving the crash, Ralph stays levelheaded and wants everyone to focus on getting home. But, the only way to do that is to keep their humanity by not succumbing to the savage tendencies (Anjum 3). Although Ralph expects the boys to remain humanistic, he dismisses the danger of other rulers. As time goes by, the atmosphere of the island begins to change, and Ralph starts to see the threat that will cause him troubles: Jack. Even though Jack gains power by being a dictator, Ralph remains strong

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