Animal Rights Philosophy

1551 Words 7 Pages
“Animals are not ours to eat. Animals are not ours to wear. Animals are not ours to experiment on. Animals are not ours to use for entertainment. Animals are not ours to abuse in any way.” (Evans 21). A great defense for animal rights is philosophy, philosophical discussions use ideas and theories about questions morality. In this case philosophy is animal rights’ best supporter. The touchy subject that is animal rights can be difficult to conclude and apply to real-life situations, but philosophy is important because it explains people 's motivations and why people feel the way they do about an issue like animal cruelty and meat consumption. Philosophical arguments are typically used to either justify certain actions directed to animals today. …show more content…
It takes so many crops and resources to raise animals for meat production. “In fact, it takes up to 13 pounds of grain to produce just 1 pound of animal flesh. To produce one pound of animal protein vs. one pound of soy protein, it takes about 12 times as much land, 13 times as much fossil fuel, and 15 times as much water.” (Walsh 61). It’s no question that it is more efficient to produce plants than it is to produce meat. “Leading scientists have warned us that food shortages will become escalade over the next 40 years unless the world 's population switches almost completely to a vegetarian diet” (Walsh 57). Not only is it not cost efficient, but the consuming meat has been linked to multiple diseases and obvious health risks. A plant based diet would improve the obesity crisis America currently suffers through. The number of positive outcomes a meat free diet can introduce to upbringing generations is endless. For one it simply supports a healthy digestive system, furthermore, it also raises the probability of achieving and maintaining an active …show more content…
In this case one can decide on their own if they believe meat consumption is healthier. The problem doesn’t lie within the benefits; it lies within the humanity. That thought that should cross your mind before you eat, where you think about what had to happen for the company you’re giving your money to had to do to make your burger or chicken sandwich. As many philosophers and animal rights activist have tried to say time and time, human or not it is no question that animals feel and think. Why would anyone want to intrude on that? The decision to consume off something else can be described as selfish. In America, today, overlapping rights is a big issue, including animals. One rights end when someone else’s

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