Animal Farm Rhetorical Analysis

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The pigs use rhetoric to convince the animals to adopt Napoleon as their leader and remain loyal to him. The animals on the farm spend their lives being a slave to the farm. Napoleon, however, abuses the animals loyalty, and even though they spend every day of their lives trying to please him, they are never good enough for Napoleon. They are constantly reminded that “Bravery is not enough... loyalty and obedience are more important” (55). After the deadly battle that allowed Animal Farm to be a free state, Squealer, Napoleon’s messenger, convinces the farm animals that their bravery in the battle was not enough. They need to obedient and loyal to Animal Farm and its leader in order for the farm to be successful. All the animals desire is to …show more content…
The animals remained loyal to Napoleon even through the harsh ration reductions and his cruel animal treat simply because the pigs state that the times now are much better than they were under Jones’ leadership. The pigs manipulate the animals minds into thinking that Napoleon is the solution to all their problems, and ultimately an amazing leader. The pigs continue to keep this idea fresh in the animals minds by “always [referring to Napoleon] informal styles as ‘our Leader, comrade Napoleon,’ and the pigs liked to invent for him such titles as Father of All Animals, Terror of Mankind, Protector of the sheep-fold, Ducklings’ Friends, and the like” (93). These titles convince the animals of a lower intelligence level that Napoleon is truly the nice person that the title refers to him as. They also keep the animals thinking that Napoleon is committing these horrifying tasks in order to better the lives of the animals on the farm. The constant reminders of Napoleon’s greatness keep the thought of rebellion to a minimum and keep the animals …show more content…
Napoleon constantly broke the rules that the farm had first established and lied to cover up them up. Snowball became the constant excuse for every one of the farms problems, every time something happened on the farm that was not desirable Napoleon forced all the blame on Snowball. Even natural disasters are blamed on the helpless Snowball. One night there was a huge storm that swept across the farm and destroyed the farms precious windmill in the process. When the animals discovered this had happened Napoleon is quick to assert that “Snowball has done [it ] in sheer malignity trying to set back our plans and avenge himself for ignominious expulsion [. Snowball] has crept here under cover of night and destroyed our work of nearly a year” (70). This was obviously a lie, but unfortunately, the animals on the farm soon began to believe these lies about Snowball. As time went on many of the animals that used to be loyal followers of Snowball began to fear him. This was all a part of Napoleon’s plan to become the supreme ruler, because if he got the animals on the farm to stop being loyal to Snowball, there would become loyal to him. Not only did Napoleon uses Snowball as the excuse for all the farms problem but Snowball became the cover-up excuse for Napoleon’s many lies. As Napoleon starts trading with the outside world he assures the other

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