Anglo-American Rebellion

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During the two decades leading up to the American Revolutionary War the British government instituted a fair amount of policies concerning the their North American colonies. Almost all of these incited colonial resentment, whether in the form of sabotage, violence, or American committees. William Pitt’s intervention in the French and Indian War in 1757 caused the first experience of Anglo-American tensions. The colonial governments thought of themselves as largely independent prior to the war, but still swore fealty to the British Crown. This was only a precursor to the attitudes the American colonies would have of the British government, especially after the 1760 succession of King George III of Great Britain. The first wave of boycotts …show more content…
Various rebellions and boycotts were localized or weren’t concerned with British rule until 1765. Before this, Grenville believed Parliament had total authority over all of the English Dominion, including the colonies. Their presence and influence was not disputed in the American region until 1765. He put more focus on the administration of the colonies by requiring British colonial officials be present in America and severely limiting colonial administration. However, starting with the House of Burgesses and the Stamp Act Congress, arguably the most effective colonial assembly in terms of avoiding bloodshed and succeeding in their goal, Americans had a little more voice in British politics. Through demands of these assemblies and mobs throughout the colonies the Stamp Act was repealed, but the following Declaratory Act of 1766 that virtually ended colonial power was largely ignored by the celebrating American public. Even though Parliament thought it had absolute control of the colonies, the committees of correspondence still formed in response to the Intolerable Acts, which in turn were a consequence of the Boston Tea Party. The Intolerable Acts included revoking most of Massachusetts’ autonomy, this being the second instance of Britain ending self-governance in the colonies, the first being the closing of the New York Assembly. Both were seen as a martyr of …show more content…
These factors helped encourage dissent within the American colonies and extract the want for freedom in its

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