Angela's Ashes Analysis

Superior Essays
Goodmorning people of the literary convention. It is the 21st year since the famous memoir, Angela’s Ashes, was published. Angela’s Ashes is a moving memoir written by the famous Frank McCourt. Frank McCourt goes into great detail of what it was like to grow up in the miserable city, as he likes to call it, Limerick. There are many instances throughout the novel in which we question what Frank McCourt is really saying. For some it is very blatantly obvious and for others not so much. Frank McCourt is able to manipulate the reader in order to sympathise and believe the terrible lies that just keep forming throughout his novel. Some may argue that Frank McCourt is not an unreliable narrator and deserves his novel to be recognised as non - fiction, however his memoir is …show more content…
Teresa Carmody was a young girl in which Frank McCourt claimed to have sexual relations with in his novel. After publishing the novel it was later exposed by Limerick locals that Teresa Carmody was suffering from tuberculosis and was near death. A young girl suffering from tuberculosis would have not been able to have sexual relations with anyone at that stage of her life. A tv recording later showed a man asking Frank about these sexual relations. He claimed that Teresa Carmody was just a name he had made up in order not to expose the true identity. What is the chance that Frank McCourt made up a name and it just happened that a girl in Limerick also had the same name? Not very high. This here clearly is another lie. Further enforcing that Frank McCourt’s memoir is merely just a representation of events, perspectives, and experiences. He changes and manipulates his life in order to keep the reader interested. He believes happiness is hardly worth anyone’s while so he chooses to dwell on all the negatives, while taking it to the extremes of lying and exaggerating the truth in order to dramatise the

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