Andrew Jackson A Hero

1737 Words 7 Pages
Andrew Jackson, also known as the “Common man” because of his “humble” beginnings, was the seventh president of America who served from 1829 to 1837. While he was seen as a war hero prior to his presidency, he was known to abuse his power while in office. Due to Jackson’s grave injustices being carried out throughout his presidency, which in fact resembled a tyranny, he should not be considered one of America’s greatest presidents. His many enemies, including John Quincy Adams, Nicholas Biddle, John Marshall, Henry Clay, James Monroe, Native Americans, John C. Calhoun and Daniel Webster prove the conclusion that he was a terrible president, correct. John Quincy Adams served as the sixth president of the United States and he was the son …show more content…
Calhoun was the seventh vice president of the United States and he was also a Secretary of the War of 1812 and a Secretary of State. He was known as a War Hawk, which is someone who advocates for war, and he did so for the War of 1812. Even though Calhoun was Jackson’s vice president during his term, they were not always on the same page when it came to running the country. While John C. Calhoun advocated for states’ rights, Jackson did not. Instead, Jackson focused on federal power. In attempt to establish a connection between states’ rights and nullification, party members that advocated for state’s rights held a toast at a celebration for Thomas Jefferson in April of 1832. When it was Jackson’s turn to give his toast, Calhoun and his states’ rights were humiliated. Later that year in December, Jackson issued the Nullification Proclamation, which prohibited a state from nullifying a federal law, reacting strongly against the state. Due to their separate views on many issues, John C. Calhoun and Andrew Jackson were widely seen as enemies even though they were partners in …show more content…
As previously stated before, in the Worcester v Georgia case he did not feel that the Cherokee Indians should be portrayed as an independent group. It was ruled in this case that the Natives had the right to self-govern themselves and that the federal government could not interfere, and Jackson ignored this ruling. He continued to try to force the Indians out west and take their land in the Indian Removal Act. Under these terms, Indians living east of the Mississippi were forced west of the Mississippi. This march west, which resulted in many Indian casualties, was referred to as the Trail of Tears. In advocating this, Jackson withdrew legal rights of the Native Americans by removing them from their land

Related Documents