Andrew Jackson Research Paper

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Andrew Jackson was the seventh president of the United States and served our country from March 4, 1829 to March 3, 1837 (Andrew, Jackson 1). Jackson remains one of the most controversial of all American historical figures, and is known for committing crimes against the Native Americans and fighting for his people (Richardson, Chris). Not only was he a war hero, but a two-term president commonly known by the nickname, “Old Hickory.” This was because he was a strict officer and his troops claimed him to be “tough as old hickory” wood on the battlefield (Brookhiser, Richard). In fact, the most famous open house held at the White House was when President Andrew Jackson moved in on March 4, 1929 the event had about 20,000 visitors. Jackson …show more content…
The vote was then split amongst Henry Clay, John Quincy Adams, and William H. Crawford. Since the votes had to be split, the decision was made by the House of Representatives, in which Adams became the President. Jackson and his supporters were furious of this outcome (Andrew, Jackson 2). When the next election occurred in 1828, Jackson’s cause was more assured. The candidate for Vice President with Jackson was John C. Calhoun. In 1824, he received the popular vote but lost the presidential election. This was in contrast to when he won in 1828, as a the Democratic candidate for president. Jackson and his running mate James C. Calhoun won the election of 1828 with 178 electoral votes and 56% of the popular vote. Most of Jackson campaigning in the 1828 election was on the defensive against his opponent John Quincy …show more content…
His dislike of the Indians went all the way back to when he was a military commander under President James Madison when he ignored the commands from the President to protect Native American land (Brown, William Garrott). Within the eight years of Jackson’s time in office, he made about seventy treaties with Native Americans in both the South and the Northwest. A new era had been formed initiating the policy of the Indian Removal Act. This law was signed by President Jackson in 1830 (Indian Removal Act). This required all Native Americans to find resettlement. During the years, 1830 to 1840 about 60,000 Native Americans were forced to migrate. The Trail of Tears was followed after the Indian Removal Act. With the help from Martin Van Buren, Jackson had the power to exchange land with the Native tribes without their agreement. Jackson’s domestic policies have never been popular especially as historians look back on his presidency

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