Ancient Egyptian Tattoos And The Origin Of Art And Body Art

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Body art has been around for centuries. It has been a way to express ourselves, express our affection, or to express our social status. Whether it was permanent or temporary it has been a part of our society and has affected how society views people. The ancient Egyptians really brought tattooing to life and it has been ever blooming since then. Originally, tattoos were believed to have begun some time around 2000 B.C. In 1991, however, scientist discovered a mummy that they dated to be around 5,200 years old. The mummy had small tattoos scattered around its body. This meant that the earliest tattoos were now from 3350 B.C. to 3100 B.C. (The Incredible Age of the Find). This mummy became known as Iceman. Iceman was discovered near the Italian-Austrian …show more content…
Geometric shapes and designs were also occasionally used. The most common places for these tattoos were the lower abdomen and the top of breasts. For this reason, it is believed that these markings called upon the divine to protect the women and unborn child during the pregnancy and during childbirth. As Egypt began to evolve, so did tattooing. Tattoos became more popular, more colors were used, and more imagery came about. Egyptians strong belief in life after death became a strong impact on the tattoos. Tattoos became a dedication or memorial to the gods and goddesses. Tattoos began to symbolize social status. Pharaohs’ power and authority was displayed through symbols and images depicting the gods and goddesses. Animals, which were held in high regard, were depicted in artwork as well as tattoos. The Egyptians began using more bright and vibrant colors rather than the dark colors they had been using. Colors had meaning behind them. Red indicated outdoor working youth, while yellow would indicate indoor working women. The deity, or supreme beings, had tattoos using gold or blue coloring. This was because those colors were more rare therefore reserved for those who deserved it most. Black was used for royalty and also represented fertility (The History of Egyptian Tattoos and Their Influence on Modern Day Body …show more content…
O’Reilly’s version was an improvement of Thomas Edison’s patented machine for “Improvement in Autographic Printing.” Tattoo guns have evolved since then becoming lighter and less painful. The guns have advanced so that the artist can control the speed of the needle, the depth, and its pressure. The most recently patented machine, patented in 2008, is lighter, easier, and more effective (Gilman). In earlier eras, tattoos became more of a man thing. Unlike ancient Egyptian culture, where it was primarily a woman thing, men tended to get tattoos more than women. Tattoos, because of pain that was involved, took a manlier role because men were noted to be stronger and capable of handling the pain. Also tattoos received the reputation for being less respectable. Tattoos were very popular among men in jail and sailors. Today tattoos are a very common among everyone. According to a study done by the Pew Research Center in 2006, approximately 36 percent of Americans ages 18 to 25 have a tattoo and 40 percent between the ages of 26 and 40 have at least one tattoo as well (Tattoo Facts &

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