Anatomical Functions Of The Human Body

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The human body is a complicated thing. No one realizes what all goes through the mind just to do a simple task. The different anatomical features in the human body are many as are the physiological aspects in which all of these various organs and nerves work together. There are many types of tissues that come together make up the four main systems in the human body. These systems intertwine and jointly work together for a person to eventually phonate, breathe, or just walk around a room. The processes for a person to produce the word "deep" requires copious amounts of organs with these different systems to work together to produce the syllable. The nervous system involves the brains and all the nerves, even all the way down to the spine. …show more content…
The phonotory system has mostly cartilage except for the hyoid bone. As air is passing through the larynx and the laryngeal membranes, the vocal folds are abducted resulting in medial compression at the midline so air cannot escape. The thyoarytenoid makes up the majority of the vocal folds. The stylohyoid contraction at mandible will draw the hyoid up and down. With the tongue, positioning is helped by the hyoglossus in the phonotory system. Phonation is initiated as air pressure below the glottis overcomes medial compression, now the vocal folds are …show more content…
The air arrives at the oral cavity where the articulatory system takes over forming the perceive speech sounds. First as the air come into the oral cavity is stopped once again by the tongue blocking the air by holding against the alveolar ridge of the mouth. The consonants /d/ and /p/ are produced by the manner it is articulated, the positioning of the articulators in the mouth, and by voicing. The /d/ is a plosive and soon pressure is let loose and the vocal folds are vibrating to produce the /d/ sound. While the formation of the word is going on the lung volume is going to approach resting levels and the external intercostals will remain active to counter expiration. The vowel /i/ is made by resonance with tongue placement and height. As the /d/ phoneme is produced the tongue goes high and to the front to produce the /i/ sound. Phonation is still sustained. The /i/ sound has been formed and not the person has created more pressure by closing both of his lips for a few seconds then letting out a small burst of air. Then the pressure below the glottis equalizes with the atmosphere and the speaker can begin taking a new

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