Argument Against Cognitivism

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The argument against cognitivism is dubbed non-cognitivism, which is a form of expressivisim, that comes in many forms including emotivism, prescriptivism, norm expressivism, quasi-realism, and assertoric descriptivism. Cognitivism is the idea that an ethical question has a right or wrong answer simply in being, so thus in non-cognitivism one is going against this idea of black and white, or that moral absolutes does not exist. Each of the types of expressivism is unique in its approach. For example, in Emotivism statements not based in science are without significance, and thus cannot be true or false, for only an absolute can be true or false, and scientific absolutes are the only true absolute. One of the most noted arguments in non-cognitivism …show more content…
According to Mackie’s Argument “1. If there are genuine moral requirements, then they must be intrinsically motivating and intrinsically reason giving. 2. Nothing is either intrinsically motivating or intrinsically reason giving. 3. Therefore, there are no genuine moral requirements.” . This argument can be logically translated, and then tested, using a truth assignment test as to its Logical Validity; 1. (G1  (M0 • R0)) ≠ 1, 2. ~ (M0  R0) = 1,  ~G1 = 0. Thus, the argument for Queerness as he posits is logically valid, as no possible cases have premises that are all true and the conclusion false. So, building from this logically valid argument, one can evaluate the individual kinds of queerness, which is divided into two main categories; first the metaphysical (motivation and reason) and second the epistemological. For this paper, one will evaluate the motivational queerness, “moral judgement requires that we motivated to act in accordance” .
The link between moral judgment and motivation is one in which moral judgement requires the facts to produce the motivation required to act and classify something was wrong. Where as in motivational queerness, it is the discovering of the moral object that one becomes

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