Analysis: The Omnivore's Dilemma

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Corn is used in almost every steps of the food production, today. In the book The Omnivore’s Dilemma, Michael Pollan shows us his points about how corn influence American culture and trying to help people to notice what they are eating. Pollan believes that corn occupies a huge part of human’s life because of the industrial food chain, which makes corn produce in a highly efficient way, and most of that corn comes from American Corn Belt. Corn is a crop which is highly used today, and there are many products contain the ingredients of corn. The economics status of the United States has been influenced by the production of the corn in various aspect, which leads the development of the American culture that plays an important role throughout …show more content…
Comparing to the natural food, the processed food becomes much more normal and convenient in people’s daily lives, which shows us that people have already adapted to an industrial eating life. Pollan indicates his perspective on the introduction of the processed food, demonstrates that, “In many ways breakfast cereals are the prototypical processed food: four cents’ worth of commodity corn transformed into four dollars’ worth of processed food. What an alchemy!” (93). After the World War II, the processed food is highly used in America and many companies starts to spread these new kinds of food. Those companies obtain such a huge profits from the corn, and the only things they need to do are purchase the cheap corn, and then transport it into the industries. Meanwhile, corn also provides much energy when it turns to processed food. Pollan writes, “It makes good economic sense that people with limited money to spend on food would spend it on the cheapest calories they can find, especially when the cheapest calories—fats and sugars—are precisely the ones offering the biggest neurological rewards... growing corn is the most efficient way to get energy--calories” (108), which obviously certifies that processed corn is economical. Not only the junk food but also many frozen food is processed food, which influences people’s life with frequent emergence. To some extent, corn has reshaped the American culture with the help of industrial food chain. With people’s consuming in this modern country, people pursue the economic and convenient food more, which means that American culture has been replaced

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