Analysis Of Woman In E By Ragnar Kjartanson

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Throughout my visit to the Hirshhorn Museum there were many video, drawing, and sculpture pieces that really struck me. However, the one instillation that spoke to me the most was a performance piece called “Woman in E” by Ragnar Kjartansson. While I was walking around the museum I kept hearing this ominous and melancholy guitar strum. I originally had thought it was some odd music playing over the sound system to give the entire museum an eerie feel - however, as I kept walking the sound got louder and louder until I arrived at this giant ring of gold tinsel hanging from the ceiling. I peeked inside the ring of these glimmering steamers to see a woman, standing atop a rotating circle platform which also covered in the same streamers, wearing …show more content…
In connection the “Woman in E” Kjartansson was obviously trying to connect his audience with the tragedy of classical theatre and was trying to evoke pity or sadness. As I had sensed, “Woman in E” is definitely connecting the old-school classical theatre with the golden tinsel. Moreover, the melancholy E-minor chord conveys the pathos Kjartansson is most known for. As it turns out, Kjartansson’s “use of durational, repetitive performance to harness collective emotion is a hallmark of his practice and recurs throughout his work” (“Ragnar Kjartansson Biography”). This repetitive nature is also seen in “Woman in E” by the constant strumming of the guitar. I believe the repetitive nature of the melancholy chord really helps emulate pining and longing in this instillation specifically by the way the chord rings in the ear and lingers before she strums the chord once …show more content…
Abramovic, often known as the mother of performance art, has many pieces that could be seen to represent love, lovesickness, and the like. However, to me, “The Artist Is Present” truly showcased the feeling of longing that Kjartansson emulates in his work. “The Artist Is Present,” held at the Museum of Modern Art, is an installment where Abramovic sat in a chair in front of a table across from another chair where visitors would sit for as long as they pleased - however, most only stayed for 5 minutes or less. Abromovic simply sat and stared at the visitors, looking them in the eye the entire time (“Marina Abramovic: The Artist Is

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