Analysis Of Wodehouse's Discernment Of The Human Psyche

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Wodehouse’s Discernment of the Human Psyche Throughout the many works of P.G. Wodehouse, a unique sensibility and insight into the human psyche emerges with every turning of a page. The author manifests an in-depth understanding of the interworking’s of man’s labyrinth-like mind with the illustration of dynamic and personable character types. He painstakingly exposes the inner thoughts, feelings, and motivations of his prominent characters in order for the reader to gain a fascinating connection to the character. In fact, because the author denotes such a profound system of in-depth characterization, the conclusion can be drawn that Wodehouse was well informed in the area of psychological theorem, specifically the works of Sigmund Freud. In …show more content…
Pickering. He develops “wild and unfamiliar emotions” which prompt him to stalk Bill and Claire, whom he perceives as scheming burglars, through the summer night’s forest. Prowling through the darkness after two would-be criminals with a pistol in hand is quite a contrast from the usual irresolute character of the car salesman, who often subsides to fearful shudders and tremors during times of distress. Wodehouse elaborates on Dudley’s mental state by explaining “now-thirty-odd years overdue- boyhood had come upon him”(Wodehouse 218). The illustration of Mr. Pickering aligns quite well with Freud’s description of regression in that Dudley possesses the symptomology of refraining to childlike behavior as a defense mechanism in order to cope with his difficult circumstances. Moreover, Wodehouse comments on Dudley’s regression in the forefront of chapter seventeen by expressing that “Boyhood, like measles, is one of those complaints which a man should catch young and have done with, for when in middle life it is apt to be serious” (Wodehouse 218). This comment, in addition to the saga of Dudley Pickering and the fact that Freud’s work concerning regression was published in 1900, formulate conclusive evidence for Wodehouse’s knowledge and utilization of the Freudian theory of regression in Uneasy …show more content…
The dance, though deemed by Polly as Greek in origin, “was far less like a dream of psyche than a troubled nightmare of the Tennessee Bear-cat, fallen asleep while brooding on how he should induce the lightweight champion to fight him to a finish” (Wodehouse 94). This unusual reference to conflict, which happens to take center stage for a period of time, stands contradictory to the conventional twilight-like feel of Riegelheimer’s. Normally, when a barefoot dancer takes to the stage, a performance picturesque of beauty and grace is to be expected. Yet Polly executes an aggressive and vigorous style and nevertheless receives rave reviews from her audience, thus raising the question as to why. The answer lies in the theory that Wodehouse intended to implement a satirical representation of Freudian repression in Uneasy Money. If this is correct, Lady Wetherby’s hostile Dance of Psyche embodies the symptomology of anxiety and depression resulting from society’s blind eye to very real prospect of war and

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