Analysis Of Wilfred Owen's Poetry

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Wilfred Edward Salter Owen born 18 March 1893 died 4 November 1918 was an English poet and soldier, one of the leading poets of the First World War. His shocking, realistic war poetry on the horrors of the trench and gas warfare he started doing poetry to tell the stories of the trenches he also was heavily both to the public perception of war at the time and to the confidently patriotic verse written by earlier war poets such as Rupert Brooke . his poetry gave such a detailed view on the war he described the life in the trenches and the horrors of gas warfare.
From his works Dulce et Decorum est, Insensibility, Anthem for Doomed Youth, Futility
Dulce et Decorum est
Its vibrant imagery and searing tone make it an unforgettable excoriation
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Compassion is useless, and they certainly should not be looked at as rife with poetry or sentiment. The soldiers are barely men, in fact just "gaps for filling" and the numbers that make up the losses. No one really cares about them. This belief, beautifully articulated by Owen, that the young soldiers are replaceable and less than human is present in the work of all of the great WWI poets. Of course, Owen's poetry seeks to refute those truths and to give dignity and worth to the young men so brutally ignored; he does "bother" with them In the second stanza he continues, saying that the young men do not care about themselves or about others anymore. They have dulled their senses and do not try to make heads or tails of their situation. It is easier to take things as they come, and they barely even pay attention to the course of the war. One of the common themes voiced in the recollections of WWI is just how utterly irrational it all seemed, and "Insensibility" gives voice to that assertion. In the third stanza Owen claims that these soldiers are better off without an imagination; no doubt it is simply too painful to consider life at home, or the possibilities for a normal life after the war. All of these emotions are simply extraneous and unnecessary; there is no point to colors like red, for they have "seen all things red", and they no longer feel anything …show more content…
It was written in the fall of 1917 and published posthumously in 1920. It may be a response to the anonymous preface from Poems of Today (1916), which proclaims that boys and girls should know about the poetry of their time, which has many different themes that "mingle and interpenetrate throughout, to the music of Pan's flute, and of Love's viol, and the bugle-call of Endeavor, and the passing-bells of death
Owen begins with a bitter tone as he asks rhetorically what "passing-bells" of mourning will sound for those soldiers who die like cattle in an undignified mass. They are not granted the rituals and rites of good Christian civilians back home. They do not get real prayers, only rifle fire. Their only "choirs" are of shells and bugles. This first set of imagery is violent, featuring weapons and harsh noises of war. It is set in contrast to images of the church; Owen is suggesting organized religion cannot offer much consolation to those dying on the front. Kenneth Simcox writes, "These religious images...symbolize the sanctity of life – and death – while suggesting also the inadequacy, the futility, even meaninglessness, of organized religion measured against such a cataclysm as war. To 'patter out' is to intone mindlessly, an irrelevance. 'Hasty' orisons are an irreverence. Prayers, bells, mockeries

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