Analysis Of Verbal Communication

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Everyone, everywhere, at any time is communicating in some way. Verbal communication is the most widely recognized form, but an individual can speak volumes without ever opening their mouth, through nonverbal communication. In the textbook Communication: Principle for a Lifetime, Steven Beebe, Susan Beebe, and Diana Ivy give tips on how to deliver a memorable speech that utilizes effective communication. I will also analyze my classmates’ speeches to exemplify devices that make a speech entertaining and engaging. An effective communicator thinks about how to engage the audience both verbally and nonverbally. A strong communicator considers how to maintain the audience focus during the speech, along with how to make the audience feel included. …show more content…
Presentation aids are “anything the audience can see or hear” (362) or experience with one of the five senses senses. They are many types of visual aids objects, models, people, pictures, maps, or even a video. During classmates presentations I noticed the most engaging types of visual aids belonged to Bryce and Zach. Bryce showed a video of how a car’s automated braking system worked. It was helpful because it was something that would have been taken a long time to explain and bored the audience with technical terms. Zach brought a different type of visual aid for his speech on Hockey. He brought a physical object, “objects add interest to a talk because they are real” (363). He showed some of his hockey equipment and was able to demonstrate how it was used. The audience was engaged because the audience could physically see the objects and felt more connected with the …show more content…
A speech is hard to follow if the listener cannot figure out where the speaker is going with their presentation. Chloe also did a good job of clearly organizing her speech to make it easy to follow. She organized her speech about different types of learners in a problem and solution type of organization, “organization by discussing a problem and then various solutions” (330). She first explained one of the types of learners, visual, auditory, or kinesthetic and then proceeded to say what study habits were the best for that type of learner. Next she went to the next type of learner. Having this established pattern in her speech made it really easy to follow and engaging because I knew her purpose of the speech. Using that pattern also helped to build redundancy because “when you speak it is useful to repeat key points” (390). Brianna did a good job outlining her main points in the Introduction and repeating them in the transitions, so the listener always knew what was coming next. Organization of the main points and transitions are important to engage the

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