Analysis Of Vanishing Voices

1955 Words 8 Pages
Vanishing voices was the source that inspired this paper. Many languages soon will disappear before people know they exist. Language has a huge impact on culture, it is the basis for communication between the people who make up the culture and traditions. Many small languages have to learn large languages to connect with those in the surrounding world. Aka, a language in Palizi a hamlet in Arunachal Pradesh, is on the endangered language list. Many stories are told throughout generations in Aka culturally, however, as young Akas lose interest the culture is dying. This is happening to more than just the Aka language and culture. I began to look into what causes the loss of interest in native culture and language. In a world where certain languages …show more content…
As the use of English increases cultures worldwide are threatened. According to Ethnologue: Languages of the World, in 1996 the English language had 322 million first-language speakers, and in 2016, 339 million first-language speakers (www.ethnoloque.com). Over the past ten years the amount of first-language English speakers has increased by 17 million people. As the amount of people natively speaking the English language increases the expectation to know the English language also increases. As time progress so does technology and our way of life. Previously, a ton was done by word of mouth. In Vanishing Voices, Russ Rymer discusses some languages going extinct, such as Aka. A huge aspect of the Aka culture is telling stories in the formal traditional version of Aka. As the modern technology changes, things are no longer done the way they were in the past anymore. Globalization and Culture Identity, written by Dr. Yusuf Örnek briefly talks about accidentally becoming apart of global culture. Örnek mentioned children replacing native fairy tales, songs, celebrations and stories with computer games which are manufactured on a different continent and in many cases in a different language. Dr. Yusuf Örnek writes, “English is the common language of use on the internet and if one is expressing oneself on information technology, it is the English terms, which [then] become inserted into the local language, ” (Örnek). …show more content…
As the use of English has become more prominent in the business world, it has forced cultures to adapt, and abandon their practices. Many multinational companies require their employees to speak English in the office. Global Business Speaks English, says this is the company’s “attempt to facilitate communication and performance across geographically diverse functions and business endeavors,” (Neely). Although this may be the best policy for the business side of things it threatens the cultures of the employees who do not natively speak English. Tsedal Neeley, the author of Global Business Speaks English, talked about how when employees are forced to speak in English they might feel a reduced level of worth. Neeley interviewed a FrenchCo employee who said, “The most difficult thing is to have to admit that one’s value as an English speaker overshadows one’s real value,” (Neely). When so much value is put on speaking English, the mind quickly concludes speaking other languages are not worth as much, and therefore discourages people from continuing to speak their native languages. The aforementioned FrenchCo employee included the following, “For the past 30 years the company did not ask us to develop our foreign-language skills or offer us the opportunity to do so,” (Neely). Cultures are threatened because businesses put

Related Documents