Analysis Of Urie Brofenbrenner's Ecological Theory Of Development

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Throughout our study of developmental psychology, we have had the opportunity to explore many fascinating theories, each of which highlights a different aspect that forms the individuals we are and will become. Well-known names in the field of psychology have put forth numerous developmental theories, which point to the idea that there is not one definitive element or factor that affects our growth and progression more than another does. The theories put forth run the gamut of influence, factors such as genetics, morality, environment, behavior learning, and personality to name a few. The question is not if each of these factors affects the individual, rather the degree of influence these factors have on you and me. My paper will explore …show more content…
Brofenbrenner defines several elements at work within a larger system, all interacting, and influencing one another to some degree, thus affecting the development of the individual (Witt & Mossler, Chapter 2). Brofenbrenner defines the microsystem as consisting primarily of the following elements: family, school, neighborhood, and membership within a particular religious group (Witt & Mossler, Chapter 2). Each of these elements interrelates within a larger system of influence affecting the individual, which Brofenbrenner refers to as the mesosystem (Witt & Mossler, Chapter 2). Through examination of the factors influencing development and their relation to one another, the overlap of influence among each element within the microsystem Brofenbrenner describes is shocking. Within the microsystem, I find that the largest influence on my growth and development is my family, and I will further define their influence in the paragraphs that …show more content…
One of the most astonishing things about my parents is that they have remained in a loving marriage for thirty years, despite facing many challenges that would signal divorce papers for many couples. The most challenging of the obstacles my parents have faced was raising seven children, not to mention the additional responsibility of raising a child with Autism. Not surprisingly, my parents handled the day-to-day stress while managing to work full time jobs, put us all through private school, and giving each of us individual attention. We were extremely lucky growing up to have a mother who worked in the field of early childhood, because it allowed us to have our mom around twenty-four hours a day. My dad on the other hand was a little less available, working in the field of social work, however dad made up for his lack of time with amazing culinary skills. My dad managed to put a homemade meal on the table five out of seven days a week, which was a rarity in most families. A family meal with all of us gathered around the dining room table is one of many childhood memories that I

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