Analysis Of Thomas P. Keenan's Technocreep

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Thomas P. Keenan’s novel, Technocreep, is a captivating work which aims to unravel the reader’s understanding of the world as they know it. The chapter Sensation Creep, delves into the methods used by companies to manipulate the senses and entice consumers to invest in products. Keenan paints society in a brand new light as he deconstructs the simplest aspects of everyday life and finds the ways in which we are unconsciously being influenced by companies. Looking particularly at the way scent is used in marketing, Keenan argues that increasingly sophisticated technologies allow companies to capitalize on revenue by using psychological manipulation to elicit a positive response from the human body. * Drawing on simple methods such as real estate …show more content…
* The ability for scent to evoke strong emotions and thoughts plays a major role in marketing to the senses. While there are examples of scent arousing more benign emotional responses, such as the feelings one may have after smelling something that reminds them of a deceased relative, the use of scent by companies is not so innocuous. Rather, manipulating a consumer through scent is a technique which benefits the goals of the company. For instance, Disney uses a device they have branded as the “Smellitzer” to pump distinctive scents into the air. This contraption is used in rides such as the Haunted Mansion and Pirates of the Caribbean to set an appropriate scene which will immerse vacationers into the ride. This use is rather harmless, but the …show more content…
While certain scents are typically maximized, Taco Bell’s Doritos Locos Taco employs a variety of flavours that are underwhelming enough that he individual feels as though they have not had enough. The lack of outstanding flavours, however, encourages the consumer to eat more in order to feel satiated. In regards to sight and space, IKEA’s complex store layouts appeal to kinesthetics and force consumers to walk past every product in order to exit. The confusing setup tempts prospective buyers to pick up any seemingly necessary products along the way, just in case they are unable to find them later (106). Not to be forgotten is the implementation of sounds and jingles into everyday life. One of the most well-known offenders when it comes to sounds in advertising is McDonalds. Not only do they mix in the sounds of a deep fryer during lunch time commercials, but their memorable jingle will leave listeners contemplating whether they should visit the popular fast food chain for their next meal (106). As demonstrated through Keenan’s many examples, all of the human senses are vulnerable to corporate exploitation. Granted, there are instances where businesses are appealing to the senses in a less pernicious manner. Funeral homes are known to use powerful fragrances to mask the odour of decomposing bodies (103). One company known as Neuro Aroma Laboratories has even crafted a scent known as

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