Analysis Of The Water Bottle Industry

875 Words 4 Pages
The film that we watched in class was an extremely informational and eye-opening film. The name of that film is “Tapped.” The majority of the film is has to do with the water bottle industry. The film itself is basically split into two parts, half of the film talks about the water bottle industry and the other half talks about the effects that the water bottle industry has on the environment. The film starts off in a small town named Fryeburg, Maine. The people of the town talk about how the town used to be before “they” came in. The “they” in this case being one of the biggest water bottle manufactures, Nestle. The people of the town claim that Nestle basically barged in and began to take their water, infuriating many residents in Fryeburg, …show more content…
For example, the film states that only 1% of the Earth’s water is drinkable and that by 2030, 2/3 of the world will lack drinkable water. When hearing those two facts I began to worry about our worlds water supply. I began to think how seriously the United States actually takes our water. Everyday big bottled water industries like Coke a Cola, Nestle, and PepsiCo, pump millions of gallons of water. This two me is a staggering amount of water, especially when they sell it for such expensive prices. But, there is more. The film also said that there was a year where the United States had 35 states being affected by a drought. This however did not stop the water bottle industries from pumping water. On the days of the droughts they just kept pumping, this showing how money hungry these companies are, as well as how uninterested they are in the environment. This idea bringing me into my next idea, how the bottled water industry’s plastic is effecting the …show more content…
The idea of a water bottle began in the late 70’s with the release of Perrier. Once the companies saw a rise and sales they began to make up tactics in order for the water bottles to sell better. Some of the tactics they used was saying that tap water was “unpure,” while bottled water was “fresh.” But, what they were not saying is that 40% of bottled water is merely filtered tap water. Also with all of those sales of plastic water bottles, the industry wasn’t telling you how they were affecting the environment. The world recycling rate is about 50% and in the United States it is only 20%. The fact for that being that less than 50% of American have curbside recycling. So, what happens to all of the plastic that is not being recycled? As the film showed, a lot of it ends up in bodies of water. As mentioned earlier, the film showed us a scene where there was a lake fill of water bottles, but the film also talked about the ocean. The film talked about how there is a part of the ocean where waste from our west coast and Asia’s east collect in the middle of the ocean. This causing many problems for the water and wildlife within the

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