The Strange Career Of Jim Crow Analysis

Improved Essays
Since its publication, C. Vann Woodward’s The Strange Career of Jim Crow remains one of the most fundamental books that informs readers about the history of the American South Although it has been misunderstood to highlight racial discrimination that existed between white and African- Americans, a closer assessment indicates that the author was specifically illustrating the history of the South. Through his writing, Woodward tried to solve the historical problems that existed in the South during the emancipation period. The segregation of Black Americans, Jim Crow Laws, and the integration of all people regardless of their race were among the main problems highlighted by the above- mentioned historian. It shows clearly that the author, Vann …show more content…
Terror tactics are used by supreme groups of White Americans who want to remain in control of the black slaves. Woodward notes, “Racism was conceived of by some as the very foundation of Southern progressivism” (91). There are civil rights groups that are struggling to have equal platform for both the whites and the blacks, yet some of the noble whites do not accept and support the initiatives. This leads to a slow realization of the changes until the 1960’s after the racial issues escalate and more international bodies had to …show more content…
The North is not sympathetic to the racial segregation that is going on in the South. Woodward notes, “Segregation was on the defensive; in some quarters, it was in retreat” (151). This is due to the statements issued by the leaders of some southern states who do not concur with the court’s ruling. The chapter goes further to highlight how the statements lead to an escalation in the protests by civil societies leading to the intervention of the Christian churches to try and arbitrate for peace and cohesion. The final chapter “The Career Becomes Stranger” highlights how violence because of the civil rights begins to occur both in the white and black cultures. There are rampant race riots across the cities leading to the intervention of the state. However, the blacks remain opposed to the nonviolent techniques that are used previously by the whites. Even though the hysteria is stopped, no party is satisfied. Towards the end, there seems to be some glimmers of

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Black codes relate to the the theme Encounter. During this time blacks were dealing with a lot of problems because of the color of their skin. The whites tried to earn their control back over blacks after the civil war, creating chaos ("Black Codes" West's Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005.). Black codes gave blacks very few rights, This shows how this is portraying the theme of encounter because blacks were encountering injustice and racism.…

    • 589 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    How can they defend themselves against the dictatorship of the federal government, while also attempting to enforce a system of racial control over African Americans? The attempt of southern nationalist to save the south eventually failed. But according to Woods the south had ‘come close than ever to creating southern red scare that would capture Middle America” (Woods, 2004). There is no denying that the anticommunist and southern nationalist in the south were successful at first in their attempts to limit the advancement of African American rights in America, but there attempt couldn’t hold to be solid. As time went on the views of many people in the south began to change and the fight didn’t hold weight anymore.…

    • 784 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    The 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments gave slaves hope for the right of freedom, citizenship and the right to vote but Jim Crow Laws in the south soon prevented these rights. Southern stakeholders were initially threatened by the emancipation of the slaves as they were a major asset that if taken would destroy their way of life. However; once Johnson was elected President over time he became lenient toward the south allowing them back in to parliament and their hopes soon grew. As the hopes of the ex-slaves for equality faded, the southern stakeholders’ dissatisfaction with emancipation diminished as the new position of ex-slaves developed into a system much like slavery. Emancipation raised the hope of slaves, Radical Republicans and Northerners in the beginning and while limited freedom and education was delivered and some were reunited with family members, their hopes for justice and equality were generally short lived and not satisfied.…

    • 1180 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In many cases. The Fugitive Slave Act of 1850, The Kansas–Nebraska Act of 1854, and the Wilmot Proviso would represent a longstanding struggle between Southern and Northern political opposition to equal rights for slaves. However, a majority of these legislative compromises would be contained within the jurisdiction of the federalist oversight, which was increasingly being viewed as a threat to Southern sovereignty. In the South, the values of racial purity were a major threat to the plantation aristocracy, which defined on the inequality of blacks and whites as part of the southern economy. After all, who would work the plantations if African slaves could become wage earners like many white laborers?…

    • 727 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Fight Against Segregation

    • 705 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Notwithstanding that African Americans were subjected to racism and discrimination after the abolishment of slavery, their fight to overturn Jim Crow between the years 1930 and 1961 was meet with resistance, particularly by White southerners. As a result, many African Americans employed different strategies to either fight against segregation or cope with it. While there were many different strategies employed, they all fall under four main categories. The first strategy/category is the Blacks who cooperated and accommodated to their “white alliances” in hopes of maintaining peace and making a gradual progress. The second strategy is the idea of using the legal system to fight Jim Crow, particularly in education.…

    • 705 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    But, in order for this to happen, the narratives must be articulated by viable authorial voices. The problem with extremist versions of history can be seen now in the twentieth century south. The dispute over what the Confederate Flag means to the south continues to create a divide within the people who live there. The whitewashing of the history of the American South and the Civil War continues to create racial tension as black Americans and their allies seek to remove what they perceive as symbols of hate. As many politicians attempt to stand by the revised version of history that state that the Confederate Flag is a symbol of southern unity and heritage, historical representations of the Ku Klux Klan terrorizing minorities begins to be erased or revised.…

    • 1278 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    All that was left was suffering. Even though Stowe 's book influenced the new freedoms of the former slaves, it also influenced the taking away of those rights. The violence against African Americans got worse and white supremacy got stronger because some groups- like the Klu Klux Klan- still believed African Americans to be inferior.Uncle Tom…

    • 1514 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Furthermore, people cannot stand around when a certain group of people are outcasts and are treated as if they are not humans. There is a certain extent that one take when they are constantly put down, sooner or later people will rebel like the Civil Rights Movement. He rebelled against society and fought for human rights, rights for black people that were mistreated for centuries. “...white power structure left the Negro community with no alternative” (King, 609). Moreover, black people are oppressed by white people and now they must fight back and to have rights, to be…

    • 1043 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Many people were against racial equality and wanted to continue oppressing the black community. These officials who worked in office are supposed to be working towards a unified country, yet views such as Tillman’s constricted and hindered the progress of an racially equal country. These discriminative events were occurring all the over the southern United States, not just in South Carolina. The credibility of the accusations towards African American was beginning to diminish. In Ida B.…

    • 1028 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    This book covers the experimentation done by the writer, John Howard Griffin on racism in the Deep South. The author is working to show the true racial tensions of the South during the height of segregation. As he knew, blacks are not the first people to be oppressed and found ‘inferior by a group of people’. He knew that diagnosing this would be just like diagnosing the problems of the Jews in Germany. Griffin states “…the story of the persecuted, the defrauded, the feared and detested” (Griffin Preface).…

    • 737 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays