Analysis Of The Spotted Wing Drosophila

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The Spotted Wing Drosophila, (SWD) scientifically known as Drosophila suzukii Matsumura, is not your average fruit fly. Going by multiple aliases such as the cherry fruit fly or the cherry vinegar fly, the SWD has made a rather unattractive name for itself. The Spotted Wing Drosophila’s Taxonomic Tree is as follows: Domain: Eukaryota, Kingdom: Metazoa, Phylum: Arthropoda, Subphylum: Uniramia, Class: Insect, Order: Diptera, Family: Drosophilidae, Genus: Drosophila, and Specieis: Drosophila suzukii. Lifecycle of the SWD is highly affected by the climate and weather. D. suzukii develops through three larval instars, and development from egg to adult has taken from 8 days 2 h to 10 days 3 h at 25 degrees C/77 degrees F, and from 21 days …show more content…
The lifecycle of the SWD starts with the egg. Eggs are deposited under the oviposition scar, with larval development progressing through three instars feeding on internal fruit tissues. (Asplen, Anfora et al., 2015). The eggs are translucent, milky white and form into the larva. The Larva development occurs inside the fruit as well. They are approximately .67 mm in length and grow to be about 3.5 mm. The larva feeds on the fruit compromising the fruits integrity. The next cycle is the Pupa. The pupa occurs in the inside and outside of the fruit. Lastly, the SWB becomes an adult. Adult D. suzukii are small (2-3 mm) flies with red eyes and a pale brown or yellowish-brown thorax and abdomen. (Walsh, Bolda, et al. 2011). The main characteristics of the SWD that differentiate them from other fruit flies are that the males have dark spots on the wings and more importantly the female SWD have the large serrated ovipositor, which plays a large roll in the ovipostion. A female SWB lays about 1-3 eggs per ovipostions, which is the depositing of eggs, averaging 380 …show more content…
The Drosophila suzukii are making a colossal negative effect on stone fruits and berries for the reason that the time of oviposition of eggs is during the ripening stages, or in other words the time of harvesting of these fruits. From back yard gardens to large farming corporations, the SWD do not discriminate. The SWD host plants and feedings preferences are a wide range of fruits. In the Northeast, SWD has had the most impact on raspberries and blackberries, especially fall-harvested cultivars. (Demchak, et al., 2013). Looking at the economics of the effects of SWD, one can see that the amount of funds lost to this pest is abundant, including yield losses, increased labor costs, and loss of foreign markets if fruit infest by SWD become banned from trade. In susceptible crops such as soft skinned berries, millions of dollars of fruit have been put at risk of infestation by this pest. (Timmeren, Isaacs, 2013). Once the egg is laid under the skin of the fruit, the fruit is unmarketable, and being a pest that reproduces at an accelerated rate, the infestations will reduce the yields significantly. The Giannini Foundation of Agricultural Economics provided a preliminary report of the estimated loss of production value of affected hosts from California, Oregon, and Washington, for the reason that the majority of U.S. fruit crops are from the West Coast. Taking into

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