Analysis Of The Raven By Edgar Allan Poe

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In 1809 a literary genius was born by the name of Edgar Allan Poe, impacting the world of literature using short stories, novels, and poetry that were all of a new style incorporating insanity, horror, and gruesome imagery beyond belief. In late 2004, a biography was developed by Marie Rose Napierkowski and Mary Ruby, showing the true upbringing of Poe, the creative lifestyle, and the list of the rewards he received during his time as a writer. Napierkowski and Ruby went on to say, "His poems and stories have influenced the literary schools of Symbolism and Surrealism as well as the popular genres of detective and horror fiction." Edgar Allan Poe was adopted in the year 1811 by John and Frances Allan, being raised in Baltimore, Maryland. He …show more content…
Both of these writers used his poem "The Raven" to share some of their feelings about the author and uncovering hidden meanings from his work such as death or supernatural causes that they felt had an impact on his writing. One part of this analysis I found showed the true art form of Edgar Allan Poe was when they showed how he adds stressed and unstressed syllables to add meaning and also his ability to add pauses for suspense. Most of the analysis for "The Raven" in Napierkowski 's and Ruby 's dissolution can be found in many other writings by Poe. Napierkowski and Ruby seemed to lead into more of his creative genius by analyzing one of his poems and showing what each stanza tells us and also why each phrase or word is unique and benefits the overall work that Poe created. The overall tone of the passage seems to be admiration and curiosity about what went through this literary prodigy. The leading arguments in this case seem to be why Poe was one of the most prominent writers and why he impacted the lives of people today in education and through some cases …show more content…
This article had very good argumental value and also it was very strong in bringing facts into Poe 's writing and showing the reasons behind the decisions he made. This article also seemed to have a lot of personal interest with the authors at hand because they suggest that Poe was the greatest American author to ever reach this literary success but he wasn 't the only writer incorporating these ideas of rhetoric into his writing. Poe was absolutely one of the greatest authors in American history but Napierkowski and Ruby could have fulfilled a better connection if they would have compared Poe to some of the other authors that influenced writing around the world. This comparison could have shown more potential in Poe 's work and showed his talent among other writers of his caliber. Napierkowski and Ruby also cited other poets such as W. H Auden who did not seem to be as inclined to liking much of Poe 's work by saying “The Raven” is excellent, it does not necessarily complement Poe’s subject; he concludes that the poem is “faulty” because “the thematic interest and the prosodic interest, both of which are considerable, do not combine and are even often at

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