Analysis Of The Prince By Niccolo Machiavelli

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The Prince, written by Niccolo Machiavelli, is a controversial work of literature that offers the frightening reality of how any government is truly ruled. It varies from the popular patriotic belief that our nation does no wrong, and produces the idea that greed, lies, and sin are necessary evils to a functioning nation. During Machiavelli’s time there were many transitions of power, as mankind was still settling in, and it seemed necessary to him to outline steps for the new rulers, the De’Medici family, as to gain favor. He had also hoped to influence the De’Medici rulers to form a government that was just and constant. In his hopes to influence the De’Medici, Machiavelli outlined various forms of government for the new rulers to consider …show more content…
A hereditary princedom is a state where the princes are the previous princes’ next of kin. Machiavelli taught that “unless extraordinary vices cause him to be hated, it is reasonable to expect that his subjects will be naturally well disposed towards him” (Machiavelli 5). In this system the ruler has the ability to face most problems apathetically, because he can rely on the support of his subjects. This support would be trickled down from their affection for the previous ruler, and the new prince would be able to ride on his father 's coattails. This being a hereditary system implicates that becoming a prince is based on whether or not someone is lucky enough to be born into the family. However, he prince, although he has a great deal of freedom, cannot entirely neglect and abuse his followers. To reach this point of overkill would require the prince to be either completely arrogant, without morals, or both. An example of a hereditary system is England, which, even though it now has parliament, has been a major world influence for many years. As it continued to prosper, it even produced new princedom, known as mixed …show more content…
The negative aspects of ruling a mixed princedom is that the prince cannot ever attain full power and they must inevitably hurt those he has conquered. The prince presiding over a mixed princedom can never gain full power due to his ties with the nation who appointed him ruler. This does not allow for very much wriggle room, as the prince will be under constant scrutiny of the stronger state. The prince must also hurt those he has conquered in an effort to weaken them in order to disallow any rebellion. This strongly entails the slaughter of any powerful political families, so the common people do not retain any loyalty to the past rulers. Also, by killing them in one swift move it removes the focus of the prince’s evil deeds, onto other actions of the prince. However, a positive aspect is that if the prince is acquainted with the proper knowledge on how to run the mixed principality he may rule a strong, successful reign. The prince will have an extraordinarily facile conquering of the territory if their customs are similar, and if they are not, the prince could easily stay among his people and learn from experience. A mixed princedom is also a much cheaper alternative than sending an army to conquer the land as Machiavelli writes, “A prince does not spend much on colonies, for with little or no expense he can send them out and keep them there” (Machiavelli 9). An

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