Analysis Of The Poem ' The Lord Of The Flies ' By F. Scott Fitzgerald

2219 Words Dec 1st, 2016 9 Pages
C“His name was Cross Lambert and his presence cost me demon souls. This is unforgivable and I order you to deal with him, Balthazar. I want him to suffer for what he has done and if you do this, you will be very well rewarded.”
“My lord, I shall see to it as soon as possible.”
Nightburn abruptly turned, leaving the room, ending their conversation. Returning to his room, he sat at his desk to hurriedly began write a missive to Lord Kane, requesting information on his progress. Sealing the missive, he summoned Sara, who arrived to see a pacing Lord Nightburn.
“You asked to see me, my lord?” and glad to see that he was not in as bad of a mood as she had previously encountered.
“Yes. Take this to a man in the port town of Sagera. The man you are looking for goes by the name of Bane and will be waiting for you at the Hungry Sailor Lodge.”
“Yes, my lord.” She took the missive from him and departed.
Stepping out on his balcony, he stared out across the city, still upset by the events that had taken place. The weather began to change and as Nightburn’s mood grew worse, so did the weather. Thunderstorms appeared out of nowhere surrounding the city with bolts of lightning and the sounds of thunder resounding across the land. He continued to watch the storm grow in intensity. Like a chess game, variations to his plans to bring order to the world evolved with every move made by his enemies, although he felt confident that he had accounted for every possible scenario and…

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