Analysis Of The Pearl In The Pearl By John Steinbeck

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The writer Steinbeck demonstrates his timeless vision across a broad platform of artistic writings. He suffered through the great depression and came to communicate his ailments through literature. As Steinbeck continually crafted stories and tales, the quality of his work dramatically accelerated. The writer’s books are now studied in institutions around the world. His name gained traction in the educated community as each novel was analyzed and understood. Books including Of Mice and Men, The Red Pony, and The Pearl were all written by Steinbeck. The Pearl in particular has a resounding message. This story was written as a parable to exacerbate the feelings of the lower class. As with all great writers, Steinbeck drove for change. He wanted …show more content…
She is the wife of Kino, the main protagonist, and together the couple has a child named Coyotito. Juana is essential to the story because of her undying commitment and respect for Kino. Kino and Juana have faced financial despair their entire lives. However, Juana never questioned Kino’s decisions. This concept is hidden in The Pearl’s words, but alive in the experience. Juana has an unrelenting commitment to support Kino. Although her family has always been poor, Juana seems to have a rooted belief that Kino will provide for her. Juana’s consistent loyalty is a dim light into the past. The generally accepted reality, in modern society, is that both genders are equal. Yet, in Steinbeck’s time, feminism was not a developed concept. Steinbeck’s era was completely dominated by powerful men with little regard for women. These men understood their dominance and generally expected women to adhere. Women also understood masculine authority and followed the men against any better judgment. The Pearl sets up this relationship and demonstrates it from the …show more content…
Mainly, Kino uses Juana for consultation and reconciliation. Kino knows Juana is capable of changing his life for the better and periodically approaches her in times of desperation or great opportunity. For example, while facing adversity, Kino and Juana found a pearl. The pearl was worth a fortune. Still, Kino immediately turned to Juana for advice and guidance with the new wealth and considered her ideas far more than would be expected in a masculine dominant society. Additionally, each other significant action Kino must take, he again inquires Juana for her approval. To illustrate, toward the climax of The Pearl, Kino ponders leaving his town and traveling to the city. Of course, the first person he presents this possibility to is Juana. Granted, at times Kino does not listen to Juana’s suggestions but he always feels the urge to gain her support. Steinbeck uses Kino’s reliance on Juana to demonstrate men are always influenced by women. An unknown source once stated “Behind every great man there 's a great woman.” This slogan has been used in many feminist campaigns to demonstrate female power and relates well to Juana’s situation. The modern reader may know the importance of Kino’s wife, but history would interpret Juana as an extraneous piece in a more important picture. Yet, Steinbeck was different. He knew the power of feminism and ventured to bring

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