Analysis Of The Movie Remember The Titans

Improved Essays
For our final and movie presentation I chose to watch the movie Remember the Titans. Many people may not know this, but the movie is a based on a true story. The true story is based on the 1971 Virginia state football champions from T.C. Williams High School. This was one of my favorite movies growing up, but I never watch it from the history side of it. Remember the Titans is a movie that is based around two schools being shut down and all those students being forced into a new school with both African Americans and whites. As we all know in the past mixing the two races different end in a good way. The T.C Williams High School had many issues that needed to be over handled. However, there were problems outside of school, dealing with athletes. Many of these issues had to do with the football team.
The problem with the football team is that they needed a new coach and the African American coach was hired as head coach over the more experienced white coach.
…show more content…
The movie puts in perspective the struggles that African Americans faced living within white communities. However Coach Boones (Denzel Washington) house was not the only racial discrimination that were happening. Some of them were at the very being of the movie when fights were breaking out on in the streets, in the school, and during the being of football practice. There were several times that the school had racial discrimination issues, such as fighting. I remember that one of the first days of school there were people outside on the street of the school protesting African Americans being allowed into T.C. Williams High School. Another issue that always occurred in the school was fighting. There were several times that whites thought the African Americans were trying to steal their girls or were even just talked to them. The best way that the white thought to deal with this was just to fight, so that’s what they

Related Documents

  • Great Essays

    For example, I was forced to finish my senior year from home due to the hostile environment school became due to the retaliation I experienced at the hands of my former high school 's administration for speaking out about acts of racism, such as administrator 's calling Black students "colored" and confederate flags being allowed on campus, occurring within the school. Just because Africans are no longer being sold on an auction block or forced to work in plantations across the country, does not mean racism is over. Slavery evolves as time goes on, just like technology, medicine and everything else. The Equal Justice Initiative in collaboration with artist Molly Crabapple a video titled "Slavery to Mass Incarceration", visually expressing the progression of racism from slavery to the era of mass incarceration. One of the best things…

    • 2265 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Could you imagine not being able to go to a specific school based on the color of your skin? Many African American children knew how that felt up until the 1960s. African Americans had just seriously started to fight back and fight for their rights, even going to the same school as the white children. When a law was passed to integrate school, all did so except for Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas. In the book, Warriors Don’t Cry by Melba Beals, nine African American students, including herself had to go through the experience of being in the middle of a integration feud between people who believed in equal rights and others that didn’t.…

    • 845 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Institutional racism is a form of discrimination expressed through social institutions(usually not visible). An example of individual racism can be when I first realized skin color and how I was different. On t.v., in the news, my color was always treated unequally. I remember when I first learned about slavery and the civil rights movement in school. My teachers in elementary school made us watch a movies where we seen black people being attacked by dogs, lynched and beaten.…

    • 1429 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Little Rock Nine

    • 566 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The students had been escorted by the police into the high from the side door unnoticed on September 23rd. Outside of the school the angry mobs began to learn of the students’ entrance and began to act in an angry and aggressive manner. The angry crowd began to challenge the police officers. Since the school’s administration staff were Fearful that crowd would get out of control, the school moved the black students out a side door before noon. The students known as Little Rock Nine, were under protection by federal troops when they entered Central High School through the front entrance.…

    • 566 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Several black students called their parents and we had a riot my first day of school. The national guards were called to our school to offer us a safe education. I do not know who more afraid of our situation the teachers or the students. It was hard the first month of school because I had no knowledge of what the teachers were teaching. This was because my old school was so far behind with the old books and teacher taught the material they were given.…

    • 1758 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Lucy Case Study

    • 699 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The Civil Rights Movements had a major impact on many southern states that were stubborn to the change of integration. The people of the state resisted change, especially in the schools system, they believe they was moving face… stating that you can’t end 300 years of prejudice overnight. The Lucy case was about a young African-American entering an all-white Alabama University in effort to desegregate the schools. Even though her case was won, the resistance and riots cause difficulty for her to attend the school. It also provided momentum for other southern rioters to continue, if violence would deter African-American’s to enter their schools, they would continue to use that method.…

    • 699 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Across the country, students on campuses around the world are in protest over equal educational rights. The difference between Carter Woodson and the black students was the time period, specifically the era of the television. The riots were broadcasted around the world. This sparked national interest in students all over the nation. In the earlier years of 1960, the students used peaceful “sit-ins” to revolutional style protests.…

    • 1319 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    When the mob tries to kill Tom Robinson but fails and the fact that Emmett Till got beaten by the two white men are both examples of how racial discrimination can breed violence. In the novel and in the sources found, black people were also required to attend separate facilities such as schools and churches. In one of the sources, an eight-year-old girl named Linda Brown, had to walk a great distance just to attend school while white children went to a school a few blocks away. These are the ways that racial discrimination has created divisiveness. Overall, racial discrimination was not fair towards the black community and favored the white people in almost every scenario.…

    • 1276 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    Even though desegregation had happened by the time the book was written and the film was made, the schools at times were still racially divided. I also felt the movie showed how this football program exploited their black athletes. Of interest to me was, the film’s following of the two main…

    • 1636 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    High School Walkout

    • 1412 Words
    • 6 Pages

    The poor status of our nation’s education system today persists us to reminisce upon a time in our country where changes in our inner city schools happened after minority voices were heard. On March 1968, after having enough of their inadequate school environments, the young Chicanos of East LA organized a mass high school walkout. These individuals were revolutionaries during a time their voices were ignored; they were forced to remain victims of a discriminatory school system unashamed in perpetuating racial biases and stereotypes. Today, when one reflects upon this time of racial and educational turbulence, it becomes evident that although these strong-willed and tenacious individuals fought tirelessly for improved school conditions, our…

    • 1412 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays