Analysis Of The Legalization Of Euthanasia

980 Words 4 Pages
Euthanasia is one of the biggest and endless controversies of legal ethics, health care and religion of this decade, since the society is still intolerant about these issues regardless of the advantages that this act may bring. Yet, according to Lewis and Black (2013), “[c]ountries like Netherland, Belgium and Switzerland practice euthanasia but strictly follows a criterion that applies to an individual’s request for assisted dying” (p. 865). Legalization of euthanasia does not mean that it applies to everybody that wishes to undergo this procedure. It becomes a last option of people that are terminally ill. Euthanasia should be legalized because it gives dignity to the dying person, ends the physical, and emotional suffering of the family …show more content…
Hendry et al (2013) pointed “Loss of dignity, dependency on other people, loneliness and feeling oneself to be a burden were intolerable and were important reasons for considering assisted dying” (p.19). When a patient is terminally ill, their dignity is being degraded because of the loss of mobility and capability. Included in dignity is autonomy or making decision on oneself and preserving the body’s integrity. Giving autonomy to a dying person by making him or her choose for assisted suicide can improve the ill person’s dignity, this right makes the person decide for himself or herself even for the last time before the end of their life. In addition, preserving a body’s integrity leaves a dignified memory of the dying individual. Based on article of Egan et al. (2014), discussed the reason why, Brittany Millard, a patient, chooses to end her life in her way to preserve her dignity. Brittany was a terminal cancer patient who moved to Oregon where euthanasia is legal to undergo an assisted suicide. During the interview, Brittany quoted, “My cancer is going to kill me, to have control of my own mind, which I would stand to lose - to go with dignity is less terrifying. When I look into both options I have to die, I feel this is far more humane”(pp. 64- 69). Thus, Euthanasia can be a dying person’s option to maintain himself or herself …show more content…
Suffering has many forms but the physical agony of the patient and emotional ordeals of the family are the biggest setbacks of the situation. Conforming to the article written by Butler et al. (1996), physical suffering of the patient can be dealt with analgesics or sometimes they are being sedated just to relieve their pain. When a person is in a terminal stage of the disease, where pain is an inevitable suffering, the only thing that a patient thinks is to end the misery (para. # 1-4). With the said medications, the patient is expectedly to become lethargic, and the time left for this patient to be with his or her family is being wasted. The physical pain of the patient can give the family emotional suffering. A patient seeing their family suffering emotionally will make him feel guilty and hopeless. According to the research of Hendry et al. (2013), “Participants who were terminally ill or relatives of people who had been helped to die acknowledged that the desire to end life could be a response to extreme, poorly controlled or intractable pain or, more often, the fear of it, and this influenced some participants to be in favor of assisted dying”(p. 19). Everybody wants to die in a peaceful manner and dying with pain is considered a worst

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