Analysis Of 'The Handmaid's Tale'

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On the count of three. One. Two. Three. Imagine yourself in a world where you are having the time of your life as if you were on cloud nine. But stop right there! Society comes in and slowly saps away your freedom of speech, fundamental human rights and the ability to do anything including reading, writing, and thinking. They manipulate the language to deprive you of these privileges. Alex (A Clockwork Orange) and Offred (The Handmaid’s Tale) have experienced this first hand from their government’s despotism actions. Both authors (Atwood and Burgess) create new “languages” to demonstrate its power to control others, to isolate others and to design an oppressive, dystopian populace ultimately. Language not only authenticates its power …show more content…
In the world that Alex lives in, it is a relatively normal world until Alex’s incredible life of raping, stealing, killing, and listening to classical music takes 180 degrees turn and karma caught up with him and hits him like a truck. “What’s it going to be, eh?” (Burgess) This quote is quite a famous quote (in the novel) that has appeared at the start of each part in the book. It shows how the life of Alex is changed and only to be a puppet of the government. At the first section of the novel, Alex asked this question before they started their crime of the night. He is a well-known person among the gangsters; he is living the time of his life doing what he like. He has complete control over his life and what he can do. The quote later appears in Part Two when Alex is in jail for committing murder. At this point, Burgess made Alex ask himself question to show Alex of what he has become. He has been limited to options that he can take and is not allowed to think for himself. Alex is slowly losing control of everything he had his hands on from the beginning. In the final part (Part Three) of the novel, he has lost everything: his privileges, what he can and can’t do, his family, his love for music, etc… In addition to, he has been turned into to some mechanized/reconditioned human being only to be used by other people. As you could see from both quotes, both Offred and Alex have experienced the controlling and brainwashing …show more content…
In both worlds, you can’t trust anyone with anything. The reason for this is because people would tell officials of what they are doing only to make themselves look good. Due to this, it has created a plethora of secretive faction within the dystopian community. “A password?” I ask. “What for” “So you can tell,” she says. [...] “What is it then?” “Mayday,” she says. “I tried it on you once.” “Mayday,” I repeat. I remember that day. M’aidez. (Burgess) It clearly shows in the quote you can’t trust anyone in the Republic of Gilead. There are secrets hidden among people. Atwood purposely uses the word ‘mayday’ because it sounds like 'm’aidez.' It shows how language has an effect on people due to they have to live in isolation and with the need for help from

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