Similarities Between Chicago And The Great Gatsby

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The Great Gatsby as well as Chicago, shows the renowned lifestyles found in the Roaring 20 's beyond the glamour of lavish parties. Both the novel and the musical create an ambience where drinking is plentiful, sex is a fixation, and corruption is abundant, yet they both capture how exquisite and outrageous these worlds seem to audiences in the modern era. In these worlds, everything is ostentatious, whether it 's the glitz found in the jazz club performers or the party-goers. Since The Great Gatsby discusses mostly the upper classes of the 20 's and Chicago focuses more on the lower class of the average American at this time. Being examined together they can offer a more in-depth view into this fascinating decade. Chicago is a Broadway …show more content…
Scott Fitzgerald and is about the constant rise and collapse of the recurring notion of the American Dream. Some of the smaller characters within the novel such as Mr. and Mrs. Wilson provide the reader a contrast between the middle class and the elite. Myrtle Wilson is a lower class woman who doesn’t have the lavish lifestyle she desires. Myrtle never really loved her husband George Wilson, she married him because she knew he was a gentleman and would treat her right, but when she comes to find out how poor he truly was she stated that he “was not fit to lick [Her] shoe” (The Great Gatsby,39). This proves how significant position was in society for Myrtle and how she had made a big mistake by marrying him when she’d found out that he didn’t have adequate money to own his own suit and therefore had to borrow one. She strongly stands by that because he is poor that he is also worthless. Myrtle gets involved in an affair with the wealthy and handsome Tom Buchanan. Tom can offer her the lavish lifestyle she desires that she could never have with George. Foremost of all, George and Myrtle Wilson are husband-and-wife who lives in the Valley of Ashes, as pictured in Chapter 2 of the novel. They 're the byproducts of the subversion of the American Dream. As a result, their lives are bordered on hardship, and can simply be described as …show more content…
They both concerned themselves through gossip and the tidbits surrounding the rich and famous, as if to feel a part of that inner circle of the elite. Roxie wants to be the gossiped, where Myrtle wants to illustrate that she can fit the curriculum found in the elite culture. Both women fight to make a break to be a part of this lifestyle they long for. Another parallel between these two women is that they have affairs for the same reason, for “Billy Flynn to Roxie is what Tom Buchanan is to Myrtle” ("Comparisons." 2010). A well-heeled man with some sort of elevated elite power that gives them a taste of the exciting unexplored world of the upper classes. Both of them also have a wealthier competition, Daisy Buchanan is too Myrtle how Velma Kelley is too Roxie. Merely the most peculiar parallel between these two cases is the downfall to grasp instantaneous fame. Roxie’s claim to fame is that to become "the sweetest Jazz killer ever to arrive at Chicago"( Chicago) while her counter partner Myrtle is killed, and is that of her death that brings her fame and acknowledgment that she had sought after in life. It’s only in the end that they get their desired “fifteen minutes of fame” (Warhol). Roxie can 't get an actual

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