Analysis Of The Democratic Peace Theory

1977 Words 8 Pages
One of the four sources of threat, aggregate power, is a component of the realist view that the greater a state’s resources or capabilities, the greater threat they pose to other nations. Therefore, the more missiles, ships, and nuclear weapons the Soviets possessed, the more they threatened the United States. This increased the probability of the American misperception, as the US believed the Soviets to be more powerful than they actually were. The help support their effort to appear superior to the United States, increase global prestige, and gain allies, the Soviets often lied about the number of missiles they possessed. This also allowed the Soviet Union to gain domestic legitimacy among its own people. The Soviets did not anticipate American …show more content…
Under the structural model, the tendency for peace between democratic nations stems from the time and support needed to carry out a major conflict. On the contrary, the cultural mode, detailed in the following paragraphs, claims that the tendency toward peace derives from the political belief that democracies should be friendly towards one another in order to preserve democracy in the international sphere. This theory proposes that democratic states do not enter violent conflicts with other democratic states; however, the theory does not apply to relationships between democracies and non-democracies, as the latter are not bound by public approval or the same governmental restrictions on declaring of wars. The underlying thesis that the executive of a democratic nation, whether structural or cultural factors restrict their actions, has a limited amount of choice due to the representative nature of the …show more content…
A declaration of war must originate in the legislative branch as the request of the state’s executive. Furthermore, the funding and resources needed to conduct the war must be incorporated into the federal budget, which requires another round of legislative support each time the budget is proposed. To maintain legislative support for a war requires that there be public support for the war, to ensure that state’s representatives have the political capital necessary to sustain the war efforts. While democracies must embark on this journey to conduct a war, non-democratic opponents experience far less difficulty. Unburdened by public elections, a leader can rapidly mobilize forces and procure the resources needed to maintain the force. The non-democratic state has an advantage in regards to concessions, as democratic states must go through legislature to finalize most diplomatic

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