Constant Stimuli Experiment

Good Essays
To begin the Constant Stimuli experiment, the lab recruited three subjects including two undergraduate students from the UCI Psychology department subject pool and the author, to finish the tests. All subjects were randomly distributed for gender but most of them were aged from 19 to 21. The subjects, included the author, can be considered naïve because none of them had done similar experiments before. All subjects were informed by the researcher about the purpose of the experiment and they held positive attitudes to help completing the study. There were no major deficiencies among the subjects except some mild flaws (ex. Myopia) that would not affect the result so can be ignored.
Procedures
The experiment was consisted of four linear comparison blocks. The black lines came as four different length groups (1 inch, 2 inches, 3 inches and 4 inches) and the purpose was to find out whether the size of the stimulus would affect the subjects’ judgement of difference limen. Each block contained forty pairs of black linear segments with different length flashing on the screen swiftly. Each task showed two
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The first part of the study, demonstrated a crucial point in Weber’s law that the just noticeable difference is depended on the magnitude of the original changing stimulus. The difference limen presented a changing pattern at different line sizes in the experiment. The second part of the study, however, failed to demonstrate the lineal relationships between the difference limen and the size of stimulus. The cause of the failure can be explained in many ways. One possible explanation is what limited the study. Due to the fact that the experiment was ran by students in a University, the number of subjects was limited and the data could be largely affected. The result may also be distorted by the subjects’ fatigue and boredom due to the repeated

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