The American Legion Magazine Analysis

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Alan W Dowd published a commentary about the close relationship between the United States and Great Britain as being the cornerstone of a peaceful world in ‘The American Legion Magazine”December 2016.Since the article is published in “The American Legion Magazine,” the readers are assumed to be veterans and patriotic. This magazine could also be found on tables in medical office waiting rooms so it would not be considered to be exclusive. The article is inclusive to any audience that may be interested in history, international relations, or politics He discusses the reasons why the US and Great Britain have remained close beginning with the Monroe Doctrine in the early 19th century and continues today,. The assertion that the author makes …show more content…
This portability is essential for the cooperation between military units, effective and efficient military operations. Dowd gives a lengthy history of this relationship. One usually thinks of the military cooperations in WWII and other military conflicts. He also brings into discussion the financial arrangements during these times of conflict. In the pivot years of 1941 Roosevelt and Churchill crafted the Atlantic Charter as a statement of shared values of the war aims and to bind the countries together in building a durable postwar peace.The British regarded this as a transfer of global power to the United States as the best outcome of the war. The Atlantic Charter was an implicit rejection of colonial imperialism and the dissolution of the British empire. During the war with Germany a strong unified command structure that entailed sharing and coordinating of military units of both British and American forces called the Combined Chief of Staff laid the groundwork for the formation of the North Atlantic Treaty …show more content…
Having the same language and similar culture have been an important factor to help maintain this relationship. It points out that what appears to be unilateral support has had a great benefit in the future. As a good example of this is the American support of the British in the Falkland war. Later the British allowed US Air Force bombers to be based in England when the US bombed Libya. Now there is political pressure to strengthen the military capability of both nations. The most effective and efficient method of strengthening both militaries is thru a joint effort and cooperation, With Britain’s decision to leave the European Union, the ties between the American government and shared economic goals will become even stronger. President Barack Obama’s speech prior to the “Brexit” vote angered many officials of the British government as well as the British citizens. The British citizens voted to leave the European Union and the American citizens voted to reject the policies of President Obama. This is an indication that the values and opinions of the citizens of both countries are very similar in spite of the official political position of the government. This article is an optimistic view of the future relationships of Britain and the US. The author has made a convincing statement by using details of past relationships as

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