Analysis Of The Bluest Eye By Toni Morrison

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The Bluest Eye is written by Toni Morrison, in 1970. This book aimed toward exposing the destructive idea that black skin, and black culture were inherently ugly. Also, it is about how black community hates itself simply for not being white. Morrison starts this novel with Dick and Jane text. Dick Jane text often represent basal reader. The Dick and Jane represented white wealth and white beauty. In this book, the Dick and Jane are representations of the development of the black lives. Also, this novel mostly concerned with the experience of African-American women: Pecola, Pauline, Claudia, and Frieda.
The first, novel begins “Here is the house. It is green and white. It has a red door. It is very pretty. Here is the family. Mother, father,
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She is a passive and mysterious character. Also, she is eleven years old. “Our house is old, cold, and green. At night a kerosene lamp lights one large room. The others are braced in darkness, peopled by roaches and mice” (10). In this sentences, Morrison uses simple sentence structure to show the audience that it is Pecola’s point of view. Begging of novel Pecola is a fragile and delicate child and by the end of the novel she has been almost destroyed by violence. In the begging of the novel Pecola witness her parent’s brutal fights. While her parents were fighting she simply wants to disappear. “‘please, God,’ she whispered into the palm of her hand. ‘Please make me disappear.’ She squeezed her eyes shut” (45). This made Pecola forced her fantasy world, which is her only defense against the pain. From movies and candy wrappers Pecola fantasy is to have blue eyes, she believes that having blue eyes is going to change how other see her. “Each night, without fail, she prayed for blue eyes” (46). Pecola loves Shirley Temple, she worships her because she was a little white girl with beautiful eyes. Later on the story Pecola got raped by her father and becomes pregnant. While Pecola was pregnant her baby comes out too early and dies. After all this trauma Pecola makes imaginary friend who became her only conversation partner. In this novel, Pecola represents black community’s self-hatred and ugliness. Also she reminder of …show more content…
This novel presents a realistic view of these women; they get married and have children and work for white families. Also, this novel explains the culture of women and young girls, emphasizing beauty magazines, playing with dolls, and identifying with celebrities. This novel starts with Dick and Jane text. Which represent white wealth and white beauty. Morrison wants us to accomplish with her depiction of black womanhood intra-conflict and question society obsession with beauty stander. In this novel Morrison mostly concerned with the experience of African-American women: Pecola, Pauline, Claudia, and

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