Analysis Of The Bloodlands, By Timothy Snyder

1013 Words 5 Pages
World War II is a part of history that is often discussed, but not always in its entirety. Most, if not everyone, know of Adolf Hitler, his massacre of Jews, concentration camps, and so forth. Unfortunately, not as many people know about the horrors that Stalin ordered at the same time, and even before. Bloodlands, by Timothy Snyder, dives into shocking details about what happened during both regimes in the Bloodlands, the lands including Poland, Ukraine, Baltic States, Belarus, and Russia. Snyder emphasizes that, although they had conflicting views and desired outcomes, Hitler and Stalin worked together to murder millions of innocent people and ruin the lives of survivors along the way. With a specialty in modern Eastern Europe and the Holocaust, …show more content…
Having documented accounts of those alive during the era help support his claim that Hitler and Stalin both were responsible for so much bloodshed beginning in the 1930s. Not many other authors touch on this area, coined the Bloodlands, during the era of Hitler coming to power to the end of World War II. The two major targets in the Bloodlands were Poland and Ukraine, although everywhere in the area was under attack. Poland had been an area desired by both Hitler and Stalin for some time, and they ended up sectioning off parts of it for themselves. Jews in Poland were particular targets, but non-Jewish Poles were just as likely to be killed. Ukraine was desirable for it’s crops. Stalin wanted to use collective farming to his advantage by selling the Ukrainian grain for a profit that could be turned around and used to build industry in the Soviet Union. Hitler wanted to fulfill his idea of Lebensraum, or living space, for the Germans. This is an example of how despite having different goals, Hitler and Stalin worked together to destroy …show more content…
It does not take much to say that 14 million people died by starvation policy, but it does take great effort to realize that the millions of people who perished had their own lives and stories. The discussion of seeing victims for the individuals that they were is where the primary sources play a huge role in the book. Without the primary examples, it would be hard for anyone to apply even a fraction of the humanity these people deserve. Hitler and Stalin tried hard to cover up the crimes their regimes were committing, and did not care about the individuals they were effecting. They preferred to think of these people as just another number in the population that needed to be terminated. Part of the illusion that helped remove the identities was the misconception that the Holocaust only occurred in camps. Survivors came from the camps, and Allied troops only saw the German camps, so the fact that killings took place outside of these organized areas seemed impossible. Death was seen as a victory, so to kill as many as you can no matter where was the policy. Hitler desired a dictatorship, and Stalin desired Communism, but together they shared the desire and practice of eliminating unwanted populations and erasing individual identities for the sake of elevating total

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