Comparing Plato And Socrates In The Apology Phaedo Symposium Republic

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Philosophy, in its simplest form is the pursuit of wisdom (merriam-webster.com). Throughout the ages, the world has seen many philosophers pursue this wisdom in many forms. Men like Plato, Aristotle and Socrates were all incredibly popular. With works such as the Apology Phaedo Symposium Republic by Plato and the whole idea of logic itself, it’s no wonder. Socrates in particular is incredibly well known. He was the teacher of many highly regarded men like Plato.Men who went on to teach people like Alexander the Great. In fact, he is referred to as the “Father of Western Philosophy” (www.ancient.eu) thanks to his creation of the Socratic Method. The Socratic Method is a form of learning where one poses a question that in turn causes one …show more content…
This was completely different than what the Sophists of his time believed. Sophists were the teachers that roamed Greek cities in order to teach the youth for money. They weren’t very focused on staying truthful either. He was by no means a fan of sophists. Socrates also helped shape logic by introducing Ethos. To him, how people acted and their soul’s well being were of the utmost importance. In one of Plato’s accounts of Socrates, Socrates describes the soul as having a chariot ran by a white horse and a dark horse. In this depiction, it was up to the charioteer to tame the dark horse. This dark horse represented one’s evil, arrogance and pride. This was an interesting idea at the time. This was one of may ideas posed by Socrates through …show more content…
Much of Socrates’ life is accounted for in quick snippets of stories told through Plato, Aristophanes and Xenophon. Seeing as their main goal was to make points about philosophical ideas, these depictions of Socrates tended to be vague and inaccurate (biography.com). Plato's Symposium focuses heavily on describing Socrates’ appearance. “He was not the ideal of Athenian masculinity. Short and stocky, with a snub nose and bulging eyes, Socrates always seemed to appear to be staring” (biography.com). Plato even goes as far as to say that “in the eyes of his students, Socrates possessed a different kind of attractiveness, not based on a physical ideal but on his brilliant debates and penetrating thought” (biography.com). In Plato’s writings, he also describes Socrates’ military life. All men in Athens were required to serve in the military. He served as a soldier from age 18 to 60. He even participated in the Peloponnesian War. Socrates was seen as a brave and admirable soldier in his day, meaning he had a reputation of some kind among the

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