Analysis Of The American Revolution In Red And Black

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Freedom then was not the freedom many Americans have come to know today, in fact, for many people of color during the time of the Revolutionary war, freedom was non-existent. Many scholars have chosen to acknowledge the fact that Native Americans, specifically, had many struggles during and after the war. Of these scholars, two articles, one written by Gary B. Nash and the other by Benjamin L. Carp have really caught my attention. “The American Revolution in Red and Black” by Nash was certainly an article to read, as he wrote about several important figures on both sides of the war; however, Carp’s “Nations of American rebels: Understanding nationalism in revolutionary North American and the Civil War South” was an article well worth the time despite the length. It appears when writing, Carp was interested in discussing more …show more content…
As churches cleaved along sectional lines and Southerners began sending children to schools below the Mason-Dixon line, Southern interests came under attack by personal liberty laws in Northern states and the hatred of slavery foster in Northern schools, churches, newspaper, crows, and legislatures…” (Carp 11). By including this particular piece in his writing, I believe Carp created a very strong point, specifically knowing the fact that many of those enslaved were Native Americas, along side of African-Americans. Benjamin L. Carp’s writing was definitely much more than impressive when looking at how he supports his main idea of nationalism, with that said I believe he fell a bit short in his writing as he failed to mention what the nationalism meant for the people. Looking at “The American Revolution in Red and Black” written by Gary B. Nash, the reader may find more knowledge of what a few hand-picked people experienced. Nash’s focus in this particular writing was how the American Revolution affected Native

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