The Great Gatsby Chapter 4 Analysis

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F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel, “The Great Gatsby,” is undoubtedly one of the most highly-acclaimed novels to be written in the 20th century, let alone- (arguably) one of the best novels of all time. It gains this acclaim not only for it’s story but for author, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s, underlying themes and commentaries on deeper ideas about society. Fitzgerald namely tackles the concept commonly known as “The American Dream” and how it was perceived and portrayed in 1920’s America, as well as gives his input subtly on if this is truly what the American Dream entails . In his novel, “The Great Gatsby,” F. Scott Fitzgerald implies his belief that the American Dream is dead, or at least unattainable, through his portrayal of a blind and falsely hopeful …show more content…
Scott Fitzgerald also shows that this view of the lavish and exclusive lifestyle embodying the American dream is a false one that only provides temporary high and having no lasting effect on the main person Gatsby and those around him. Fitzgerald portrays this disillusioned view through the mindless and shallow parties that Gatsby throws and how his guests react to them. For example, in the opening of chapter 4 where Nick is seen writing down a time table FILLED with people who would attend Gatsby’s parties and even still talk bad on him while in the same breath paying “subtle tribute of knowing nothing whatever about him” (Fitzgerald 66). This goes to show how much that these guests actually do not see Gatsby as he planned on them seeing him as. This lavish lifestyle is simply wasting Gatsby’s money and even possible building against his cause for everyone to see him as a successful man who has achieved and reached his respective American dream. This point of Gatsby’s disillusioned view that fitzgerald is trying to get across is built upon towards the end of the novel in the final Chapter where Nick has to reassure and actually grasp at straws and reassure Gatsby’s cold shell that he will “get somebody [to attend Gatsby’s funeral and actually care about his passing]” (Fitzgerald 175) for Gatsby. Even Nick himself mentions that he was never fond of Gatsby. This shows that even after all of that showing off and being flashy showing that he thinks he has what it …show more content…
If even this man who had tried so hard with so many different ways to gain that status has not been able to attain it, then is it even a possible concept in practice

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