Why Is John F Kennedy Important To The Family President

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The American Burden President to the Family President The people of the United States have continued their quest of the American dream for the entirety of history. The years following the 1960’s proved that the opinions of the American people on government do dictate the flow of the country. The 1960’s initiated with a young President in John F. Kennedy and the rhetoric of the American people placed the government as a burden on the people. It was not until the Presidency of Ronald Reagan that the talk suddenly switched to a government that would lend a helping hand to the American families. This change of rhetoric can be attributed to the failures in the social, economic, and political spectrum that led to the lost American national identity …show more content…
In the years John F. Kennedy was in presidency, too many events arose that lowered the confidence the American people had in the federal government. The Cuban Missile Crisis and the early stages of the Vietnam War, for example, lowered the trust in the American government. The assassination of Kennedy did ultimately lead to his ideas unifying the nation under sorrow for his violent death. His vibrant and young attitude overshadowed his failed foreign affairs. However, that quickly changed as the United States embarked further into the war with Vietnam. With Lyndon B. Johnson as the newly appointed President, the American people rejoiced with new social legislation, such as Medicare and environmental reforms. However, Johnson’s Great Society failed with the growing issues in Vietnam. Just like Kennedy, Johnson had lost the trust of his American people with the issues abroad. With the defeat of the United States in Vietnam, there was a growing sense of a broken national identity. The American people had lost a war they did not initially support. The American people were outraged that the government had broken their identity abroad. This sentiment helped Reagan consolidate his message to the American people. Reagan became successful in his message because he included a great importance to the …show more content…
Although the issues did not originate completely with Carter, the issues Carter faced helped show the shift in rhetoric in America. An important issue that helped change the rhetoric was the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, or OPEC for short, embargo in the years 1973-1974. This issue arose during the Presidency of Gerald Ford and was an issue that outraged the nation. The nation had become reliant on transport with motorized vehicles and they were not able to because the government was not able to secure the gasoline they needed to ride around town. This idea was championed by many Americans and it lead to a lower image of the American government. Reflecting back on the inaugural speech of Kennedy, the country could not secure petroleum for the needs of the American people. What good is a government that cannot secure the things Americans see as a necessity? Such questions were raised during the embargo. This made the American government a burden on its people. The issue grew greater when the Carter administration could not keep a handle on double digit inflation. The growing numbers of inflation once again let Reagan’s speech resonate that much more with the new “breed” of American people. The promises that Reagan made were those promises that a friend would make to a friend in need. Reagan would prove to be that valuable

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