The Amazing Maurice And His Educated Rats Character Analysis

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The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents is a book by English writer Terry Pratchett. This book presents to the reader a marvelous story about a talking—or very intelligent and clever, as he puts it—cat, a clan of educated rats, and a stupid-looking kid, who go from town to town to scam the villagers by producing a fake plague of rats, and then the kid would play the piper that leads the rats away with his music. That plan leaves Maurice as the master mind behind the act. The story begins when this peculiar group arrives at Bad Blintz, where they will have to face numerous tribulations that will challenge their moral stands and will make the audience ask themselves about their own. One of the most recurring themes in the book is humanity, …show more content…
Maurice is introduced as a very clever cat ̶ amazing for many, even. He is respectful of life, or intelligent life. While they’re were waiting for Malicia, Maurice pounces on a rat and promises it that he will let it go if it says anything to prove it is intelligent, but the little animal only squeaks, and Maurice devours it. Immediately, Maurice tries to excuse himself from Keith, “’It couldn’t talk’ ‘I didn’t ask you’ ‘I mean, I gave it a chance. You heard me, right? It only had to say it didn’t want to be eaten’” (84). Later on, Maurice confesses that he got his intelligence from eating Additives, a newly changed rat. His actions in respect differencing what is conscient and what is not is can be mostly attributed to the guilt he feels even after all that time. People are just like that; they will try to right their wrongs by helping others and committing to never do it …show more content…
Naturally, one would think and associate those verbs with a rat: they spoil food and chew on things and make them useless; however, Dangerous Beans gives a shocking answer: “’That’s easy. It’s called humanity’” (206). What the characters and the story have to tell the audience is that humanity is not exclusive of the animals who walk on two legs and believe they are the masters of the world, but that even the humblest of creatures can possess more benevolence and humane traits than people. Prattchett expresses his opinion through these amazing characters, and hopes to help the reader reflect on the message that no matter where one started or where one is going, there is also many lessons to be learned and many attributes to obtain ̶ such as being protective, leadership, wisdom, compassion, and selflessness ̶ to truly become

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