Summary Of Suburban America Problems And Promise

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Suburban America: Problems and Promises, a documentary produced by Ron Rudaitis, examines the changing face of suburbia in America. The intended audience for this documentary would be society, because it explored how the suburban community has and is changing historically, politically and socially. Through the documentary, Ron explored the issues that are associated with suburbs and how they are growing to become sustainable environmental regions, the changing infrastructure and redevelopment of some suburbs, and the ethnic and social change that is happening across American suburbs. The documentary provides a clear narration of how life is in the suburbs and it also talks about the challenges people face. One of the two major purpose of …show more content…
The documentary wasn’t filmed in one location, but was filmed throughout many suburban locations in the United States. The documentary is about how 50% of the population lives in the suburbs and the problems that have being associated with these communities for the past decades. Some main events in this documentary was how there was a surge in the suburbs population after the war. With low costs and loans from the FHA, many veterans who were returning from the war could afford housing to start families. In addition, Levittown mass produced standard housing development contributed to the large population movement to the suburbs. The oldest suburban houses were built in Cleveland in 1920. Another was how traditionally, suburbs voted republican, but there has been a shift to the democratic side especially during President Clinton and President Obama campaigns. Suburban life was racially standardized and the case Brown v. Board of Education prevented lower-income and minorities families from moving into the suburbs. However, the demographics of suburban life changed over time and there are many different cultures and races living in suburban communities. In addition, many suburbs are primarily dependent on automobiles as forms of transportation and many older suburban business districts have been abandoned with no restoration in the forthcoming. Despite suburban communities still existing and thriving, there are underlying problems with affordable housing in the communities. The rising costs of energy has contributed to the foreclosure rate in the regions as residents are unable to afford living in suburbs communities. The documentary also explores the similarities and differences that exists within rural, urban and suburban

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