Socrates Wisdom Causes Him To Die Analysis

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Socrates’ view of wisdom causes him to die. The oracle claims Socrates to be the wisest man and Socrates tries to find a man wiser than him. The men that Socrates has questioned are offended and angered because he accuses them to be ignorant. Others are curious with Socrates and copy his actions, but they get angered because the ignorant men are “pretending to know when they actually know nothing” (Apology 23e). People hate Socrates because he claims that having wisdom is knowing that everyone does not know everything. Socrates is therefore the wisest man because he does not pretend to know things and knows that he does not know everything. Meletus is accusing Socrates of corrupting the youth because Socrates caused people to question the wisdom …show more content…
Euthyphro learns that he needs to clarify his claims of piety. Socrates is accused of impiety and Euthyphro is accusing his father of being impious because he killed someone. Since their legal matters both involve piety and impiety, Socrates asks Euthyphro to, “ Tell [him] what [he] say the pious is, and what the impious is” (Euthyphro 5d). Euthyphro is teaching Socrates what pious and impious mean. He defines piety and impiety using examples not what they actually mean. Socrates continues to question Euthyphro and show his self-contradiction of his definitions. Euthyphro defines pious as being god-loved and god-hated as impious, but Socrates sees that the gods fight because they believe in different things, therefore piety and impiety, “Are both hated by the gods and loved by them, and the same things will be both god-hated and god-loved” (Euthyphro 8a). Socrates proves that Euthyphro’s claims of piety and impiety are not correct and contradicts itself. After Socrates is done questioning Euthyphro, he tells him that his claims shift around and they need to restart their investigation. Euthyphro cannot reason through his claims against his father because he is accusing him of an impious act and cannot define piety and impiety. Socrates questioning and pointing out the mistakes Euthyphro makes, teaches Euthyphro that he needs to justify and clarify his

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