Analysis Of Social Security: Heart Of The New Deal

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Social Security: Heart of the New Deal
On a historic day in Congress, August 14, 1935, President Roosevelt signed the Social Security Act into law. At the time, America’s economy was in shambles, which had led to an extremely high amount of unemployment rates and poverty throughout the country. Despite its goals and hopes to better the economy, it was not met without resistance. Many opposed the New Deal in favor of previously presented plans and many opposed for the belief that it was infringing on their freedom. This act’s endeavor towards providing relief, recovery, and reform to the American people was a mere reflection of the purpose of the New Deal as a whole.
Previous to the passing of this bill, similar welfare systems were presented.
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In letters addressed to the first lady, Eleanor Roosevelt, their strong opposition towards the act was unmistakable. Not only was it viewed as favoring the wealthy over the poor , but it was also viewed as stealing from those who did not require government assistance in their old age. Some suggested that one of the previously presented plans would have worked better, while an article in the L.A. Times stated that further research and study into the New Deal should have been conducted before it was signed into law. This act’s complex nature did not allow for a clear understanding of the act or what was going to be done with the money being taxed. Despite its lack of clarity to the general public, what was clear to some about the Social Security Act was it’s blatant discrimination against certain groups. In a testimony given before the deal’s passing, the discrimination against these groups was clearly laid out. The Social Security Act excluded domestic, agricultural, and government workers. These exclusions totaled to a sum of 490,000 African Americans and half of all employed women living in the country who were not offered the same relief.
This act sought to relieve not only the American people, but the economy as well, as the relief of one was necessary for the relief of the other. Despite contradicting views, President Roosevelt maintained

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