Sex The Revolution Film Analysis

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A poster from the early 1950’s titled The Sex Impulse and Achievement reads, “The sex instinct in a boy or man makes him want to act, dare, possess, strive…when controlled it gives ENERGY, ENDURANCE, FITNESS.” The poster features the image of track stars jumping over hurdles which is the perfect allusion to represent American society’s view of sex in the 1950’s and prior. Sex was seen as something necessary but dirty and taboo; sex was something you kept behind closed doors. The unclean aspect of sex was propagated by the Social Hygiene movement which taught that homosexual and extramarital intercourse would lead to venereal diseases. If that wasn’t bad enough, being caught participating in these acts would lead to severe legal repercussions. …show more content…
Filmmakers Hart Perry and Dana Heinz Perry complied what they believe are the strongest events that influenced the contemporary view of sex. In their four-part series titled Sex: The Revolution, we are presented with what the filmmakers refer to as “the sexual revolution" and how it changed American society. The film identifies many events that, when combined, led the way for rapid development in American sexuality. With the rise of Hugh Hefner’s Playboy, the advent of oral contraceptives, and the growth of student activism, society’s view of sex was drastically …show more content…
The sexual revolution is the result of many correlated events and movements. The glorification of sex outside of marriage, the spread of oral contraceptives, and the youth rejecting the preconceived notions of the generation before are simply the most substantial changes that made sex in America what it is today. Opponents may argue that the sexual revolution was just a result of time passing, or that there are more significant events that led to America’s sexual liberalization. However, it is important to understand that, without the events earlier referenced, the sexual revolution would not be possible. The idea of sexual freedom and the rejection of sexual repression needed to occur for society to accept the arguably inevitable paradigm shift of sexual

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